PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN NEONATUS AND COMPATIBILITY ISSUES: A REVIEW ARTICLE

  • Yelly Oktavia S
  • Helmi Arifin
  • Rahmi Yosmar

Abstract

Intravenous drug administration in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is critical because of poor venous access, polymedication, fluid restriction, and low
infusion rate. Since parenteral nutrition (PN) is infused intravenously, it is often considered as a vehicle for medication administration. Medications
may be added to PN formulations in an effort to decrease fluid requirements, reduce the need for Y-site injections, reduce the possibility of line contamination due to manipulation, and decrease labor time required for drug administration. Risk is further increased by inadequate information on the physicochemical compatibility of drugs.
Keywords: Parenteral nutrition, Neonatus, Compatibility.

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How to Cite
S, Y. O., H. Arifin, and R. Yosmar. “PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN NEONATUS AND COMPATIBILITY ISSUES: A REVIEW ARTICLE”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 10, no. 2, Feb. 2017, pp. 54-64, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i2.15697.
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