ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA CLINICAL ISOLATES AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KATHMANDU, NEPAL

  • CHANDER ANIL Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital
  • RAZA MOHAMMAD SHAHID

Abstract

Objective: Increasing  number of reports had documented the continued emergence of resistance among P. aeruginosa strains to common  antimicrobial  drugs, world-wide. This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates obtained from hospitalized patients.

Methods: Between January 2012 and June 2012, one hundred and forty-five strains of P.aeruginosa were isolated from different clinical specimens   and fully characterized by standard bacteriological procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of each isolate was carried out by the Kirby- Bauer disk diffusion method as per guidelines of CLSI.

Results: Majority of isolates of P.aeruginosa (120, 83.75%) were obtained from specimens of pus, sputum, urine and tracheal aspirates. The isolated pathogens showed resistance to amikacin (17.25%), ciprofloxacin (27.59%) and cefoperazone -sulbactum (34.48%).  Resistance rates to Co-trimoxazole, piperacillin, ceftriaxone and chloramphenicol varied from 51.00% to 73.00%. All the isolates were susceptible to imipenem. 30 (20.69%) of P.aeruginosa isolates were multi-drug resistant.

Conclusion: The results confirmed the occurrence  of  drug resistant strains of P.aeruginosa. Imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin were found to be the most effective antimicrobial drugs. It therefore calls for a very judicious, rational treatment regimens prescription by the physicians to limit the further spread of antimicrobial resistance among the P.aeruginosa strains.

Keywords: antimicrobial resistance, clinical isolates, Nepal, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Author Biography

CHANDER ANIL, Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital

Department of Microbiology, Professor

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How to Cite
ANIL, C., and R. M. SHAHID. “ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA CLINICAL ISOLATES AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KATHMANDU, NEPAL”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 6, no. 7, Aug. 2013, pp. 235-8, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ajpcr/article/view/317.
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