STUDY OF MEDICATION ERRORS BY PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL APPROACH IN WARANGAL HOSPITALS

  • SHIVANI RAVULA Department of Pharmacy Practice, St. Peter’s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal, Telangana, India.
  • AKHILA JANGA Department of Pharm D, Rohini Multispecialty Hospitals, Warangal, Telangana, India.
  • RAJASEKHAR POONURU Department of Pharmaceutics, St. Peter’s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal, Telangana, India.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of medication errors occurring in a multispecialty hospital in Warangal.


Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted in Rohini Superspeciality Hospital, Hanamkonda, Warangal, from October 2018 to March 2019, to study the prevalence of medication errors.


Results: In this study, 500 patients were selected, of which 160 were identified with medication errors. Two hundred and seventy-one medication errors were identified among these patients, of which 100 (60.63%) patients were male and 24.37% of patients were female.


Conclusion: This present study manifests that medication errors were predominate in males than in females and also the common age group was 50–60 years.

Keywords: Medication errors, Prospective approach, Observational study, Medication error reporting systems

Author Biographies

SHIVANI RAVULA, Department of Pharmacy Practice, St. Peter’s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal, Telangana, India.

Assistant Professor

Department of Pharmacy Practice

AKHILA JANGA, Department of Pharm D, Rohini Multispecialty Hospitals, Warangal, Telangana, India.

Clinical Pharmacist

RAJASEKHAR POONURU, Department of Pharmaceutics, St. Peter’s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal, Telangana, India.

Principal and Head, 

St. Peter's Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences

 

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RAVULA, S., A. JANGA, and R. POONURU. “STUDY OF MEDICATION ERRORS BY PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL APPROACH IN WARANGAL HOSPITALS”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 13, no. 6, Mar. 2020, pp. 54-58, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2020.v13i6.37046.
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