Review Paper SMOKING CARCINOGENS AND LUNG CANCERS- A REVIEW

Carcinogens and lung cancer

  • Chandan JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research
  • Vini Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.
  • chandu Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.
  • Shiva Department of Sciences, Amrita School of Arts and Sciences, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Mysuru Campus, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.
  • Veena Department of Chemistry, Bangalore Institute of Technology, K.R. Road, V. V Puram, Karnataka, Bangalore 560 004, India.
  • Chandru Department of Biotechnology, Davangere University, Shivagangotri, Davangere – 577002, Karnataka, India.

Abstract

Smoking ambiguity contributes to a certain revelation regarding the process by which cancer is induced. In laboratory, carcinogens induce clear lung tumour to lung cancer induction. For instance, carcinogenic chemicals viz., 4(methylnitrosomine)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), nitrosonornicotine (NNN) etc. cause tumour malignancy. It is evident from the mechanistic studies that the carcinogens have stronger tendency to mutate the genes like suppresser gene, gene that encode the receptor of cell surface to the nucleus, thus, giving way to the proliferation of mutation leading to neo plastic cells. In this analysis article, we have discussed molecular mechanics that can cause cancer by nitrosamines like NNK and NNN regarding a variety of significant cigarette combustion carcinogens and the effort to introduce a different dimensional approach to the prevention of cancer, by understanding the perspective of various treatment.

Keywords: Nitrosamineketone (NNA), 4(methylnitrosomine)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butano (NNAL) nitrosonornicotine (NNN), P53, Carcinogen, Mutant.

Author Biographies

Chandan, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research

Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

Vini, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics,

School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research,

Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

chandu, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics,

School of Life Sciences, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research,

Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

Shiva, Department of Sciences, Amrita School of Arts and Sciences, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Mysuru Campus, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

Department of Sciences, Amrita School of Arts and Sciences,

Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Mysuru Campus, Mysuru, Karnataka, India.

Veena, Department of Chemistry, Bangalore Institute of Technology, K.R. Road, V. V Puram, Karnataka, Bangalore 560 004, India.

Department of Chemistry, Bangalore Institute of Technology,

K.R. Road, V. V Puram, Karnataka, Bangalore 560 004, India.

Chandru, Department of Biotechnology, Davangere University, Shivagangotri, Davangere – 577002, Karnataka, India.

Department of Biotechnology, Davangere University,

Shivagangotri, Davangere – 577002, Karnataka, India.

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How to Cite
S, C., V. S, C. Dharmashekara, K. Shiva Prasad, V. M. Ankegowda, and C. S. “Review Paper SMOKING CARCINOGENS AND LUNG CANCERS- A REVIEW: Carcinogens and Lung Cancer ”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 14, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 5-12, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ajpcr/article/view/39811.
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