ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN WITH URINARY TRACT INFECTION

  • YOGESH OLI Department of Microbiology, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • GANESH BHANDARI Department of Chemistry, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • UPASHANA BHANDARI Department of Chemistry, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • SUNITA BISTA Department of Chemistry, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • AMRIT KUMAR BHATTARAI Department of Microbiology, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • ARCHANA KATUWAL Department of Microbiology, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.
  • NETRA LAL BHANDARI Department of Chemistry, Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Abstract

Objective: This work aimed to detect the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Escherichia coli isolated from children, as it is the most predominant pathogen of urinary tract infection (UTI).


Methods: About 530 urine samples were collected and tested using the modified Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion method to find the susceptibility pattern of isolated bacteria.


Results: Out of a total of 530 samples, 114 (21.50%) showed significant growth. A total of 8 different types of bacteria were isolated from the growth of positive samples. Among the isolates, E. coli 66 (57.8%) was found to be the most predominant organism followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae 18(15.8%), Proteus spp. 10 (8.8%), Staphylococcus aureus 8 (7.0%), Acinetobacter spp. 4 (3.5%), CoNS 4 (3.5%), Enterobacter spp. 2 (1.8%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 2 (1.8%). In the present study, out of 66 E. coli, 37 (56.1%) were multidrug-resistant strain. E. coli showed 94.0% resistance to ceftriaxone followed by ceftazidime 86.5% and cefotaxime 70.3%. Imipenem (91.9%) followed by amikacin (89.2%) seems to be the effective drug against UTI causing E. coli in children.


Conclusion: Multidrug resistance may possess difficulties with the choice of therapeutic options for the treatment of severe infections.

Keywords: Antimicrobial resistance, Ceftriaxone, Multidrug-resistant, Staphylococcus aureu

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OLI, Y., G. BHANDARI, U. BHANDARI, S. BISTA, A. KUMAR BHATTARAI, A. KATUWAL, and N. L. BHANDARI. “ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN WITH URINARY TRACT INFECTION”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 14, no. 2, Feb. 2021, pp. 152-7, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2021.v14i2.40128.
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