COMPARITIVE STUDY OF HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF ACANTHOSPERMUM HISPIDUM PLANT EXTRACT AND HERBAL NIOSOMAL SUSPENSION AGAINST ANTI-TUBERCULAR DRUG INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY IN RATS

  • Himaja N Sree vidyanikethan college of pharmacy

Abstract

Objective: Compare the hepatoprotective activity of Acanthospermum hispidum ethanolic extract (AHEE) and herbal niosomal suspension (HNS)
against hepatotoxicity.
Methods: AHEE and HNS were investigated against hepatotoxicity produced by administering a combination of four anti-tubercular drugs (ATDs)
isoniazid (27 mg/kg), rifampin (40 mg/kg), pyrazinamide (66 mg/kg), and ethambutol (53 mg/kg) for the period of 28 days by oral route in rats.
AHEE (400 mg/kg) and HNS (400 mg/kg) were administered along with 1 hr prior administration of ATDs once daily to five groups (six animals
per group) of Albino Wistar rats weighing about 150-200 g. Silymarin was used as a standard drug (100 mg/kg p.o.). Liver biomarkers such as
serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, and total protein were elevated
indicating the induction of hepatotoxicity in experimental animals.
Results: The AHEE and HNS prevented the hepatotoxic effects of the combination of isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol on the above
serum parameters. Histopathological studies of liver and liver biomarker estimations also supported the hepatoprotective effect of AHEE and HNS.
Conclusion: The protective effect of HNS was found to be significant when compared to standard and AHEE.
Keywords: Hepatoprotective, Acanthospermum hispidum, Isoniazid, Silymarin, Herbal niosomal suspension.

Author Biography

Himaja N, Sree vidyanikethan college of pharmacy
Department of pharmacognosy

References

1. Singh J, Garg PK, Tandon RK. Hepatotoxicity due to antituberculosis
therapy. Clinical profile and reintroduction of therapy. J Clin
Gastroenterol 1996;22(3):211-4.
2. Dutt AK, Moers D, Stead WW. Short-course chemotherapy for
tuberculosis with mainly twice-weekly isoniazid and rifampin.
Community physicians’ seven-year experience with mainly outpatients.
Am J Med 1984;77(2):233-42.
3. Steele MA, Burk RF, DesPrez RM. Toxic hepatitis with isoniazid and
rifampin. A meta-analysis. Chest 1991;99(2):465-71.
4. James LH. Drug induced liver disease. Adv Gastroenterol
2000;84(5):1275-312.
5. Chowdhury A, Santra A, Bhattacharjee K, Ghatak S, Saha DR,
Dhali GK. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and permeability transition
in isoniazid and rifampicin induced liver injury in mice. J Hepatol
2006;45(1):117-26.
6. Pal R, Rana SV, Vaiphei K, Singh K. Isoniazid-rifampicin induced lipid
changes in rats. Clin Chim Acta 2008;389(1-2):55-60.
7. Yew WW, Leung CC. Antituberculosis drugs and hepatotoxicity.
Respirology 2006;11(6):699-707.
8. Tahaoglu K, Ataç G, Sevim T, Tärün T, Yazicioglu O, Horzum G, et al.
The management of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Int
J Tuberc Lung Dis 2001;5(1):65-9.
305
Asian J Pharm Clin Res, Vol 8, Issue 5, 2015, 303-306
Himaja
9. Santhosh S, Sini TK, Anandan R, Mathew PT. Hepatoprotective
activity of chitosan against isoniazid and rifampicin-induced toxicity in
experimental rats. Eur J Pharmacol 2007;572(1):69-73.
10. Harish R, Shivanandappa T. Antioxidant activity and hepatoprotective
potential of Phyllanthus niruri. Food Chem 2006;95:180-5.
11. Khatri A, Garg A, Agrawal SS. Evaluation of hepatoprotective activity
of aerial parts of Tephrosia purpurea L. and stem bark of Tecomella
undulata. J Ethnopharmacol 2009;122(1):1-5.
12. Saraswathy SD, Suja V, Prema G. Effect of Liv.100 against
antitubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Indian J Pharmacol
1998;30:233-8.
13. Bello B, Wudil AM. Protective Effect of Allium sativum against liver
injury induced by anti-tubercular drugs in rats. Br J Pharmacol Toxicol
2012;3:89-92.
14. Anand AC, Seth AK, Paul M, Puri P. Risk factors of hepatotoxicity
during anti-tuberculosis treatment. Med J Armed Forces India
2006;62:45-9.
15. Mshana NR, Abbiw DK, Addae Mensah I, Adjanohoun E, Ahyi MR,
Ekpere JA, et al. Traditional Medicine and Pharmacopoeia: Contribution
to the Revision of Ethnobotanical and Floristic Studies in Ghana.
Accra: Organization of African Unity/Scientific, Technical & Research
Commision; 2000. p. 101-2.
16. Summerfield A, Keil GM, Mettenleiter TC, Rziha HJ,
Saalmüller A. Antiviral activity of an extract from leaves of the tropical
plant Acanthospermum hispidum. Antiviral Res 1997;36(1):55-62.
17. Edewor TI, Olajire AA, Olaniyan LE. Effect of oral administration
of ethanolic leaf extract of Acanthospermum hispidum on carbon
tetrachloride induced acute liver injury in rats. Res J Med Sci
2007;1(1):39-41.
18. Fleischer TC, Ameade EP, Sawer IK. Antimicrobial activity of the
leaves and flowering tops of Acanthospermum hispidum. Fitoterapia
2003;74(1-2):130-2.
19. Sanon S, Azas N, Gasquet M, Ollivier E, Mahiou V, Barro N, et al.
Antiplasmodial activity of alkaloid extracts from Pavetta crassipes
(K. Schum) and Acanthospermum hispidum (DC), two plants used in
traditional medicine in Burkina Faso. Parasitol Res 2003;90(4):314-7.
20. Agunu A, Yusuf S, Andrew GO, Zezi AU, Abdurahman EM. Evaluation
of five medicinal plants used in diarrhoea treatment in Nigeria.
J Ethnopharmacol 2005;101(1-3):27-30.
21. Deepa N, Rajendran NN. Anti-tumor activity of Acanthospermum
hispidum DC on Dalton ascites lymphoma in mice. Natl Prod Sci
2007;13(3):234-40.
22. Roy A. Study on anthelmintic and antidiabetic activity of
leaves of Acanthospermum hispidum dc. Int J Pharm Chem Sci
2013;2(3):1324-7.
23. Baillie AJ, Florence AT, Hume LR, Muirhead GT, Rogerson A. The
preparation and properties of niosomes – non-ionic surfactant vesicles.
J Pharm Pharmacol 1985;37(12):863-8.
24. Yadav JD, Kulkarni PR, Vaidya KA, Shelke GT. Niosomes: A review. J
Pharm Res 2011;4(3):632-6.
25. OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals Revised Draft
Guideline 423: Acute Oral Toxicity: Paris: Organisation for Economic
Co-Operation and Development; 2000.
26. Veerappan A, Miyazaki S, Kadarkaraisamy M, Ranganathan D. Acute
and subacute toxicity studies of Aegle marmelos Corr. an Indian
medicinal plant. Phytomedicine 2007;14(2-3):209-15.
27. Ghosh MN. Fundamentals of Experimental Pharmacology. Kolkata:
Hilton and Company; 2007.
28. Reitman S, Frankel SA. Colorimetric method for the determination
of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic
transaminase. Am J Clin Pathol 1957;28:56-63.
29. Lowry OH, Rosebrough NJ, Farr AL, Randall RJ. Protein measurement
with the Folin phenol reagent. J Biol Chem 1951;193(1):265-75.
30. Kind PR, King EJ. Estimation of plasma phosphatase by determination
of hydrolysed phenol with amino-antipyrine. J Clin Pathol
1954;7(4):322-6.
31. Mallay HT, Evelyn KA. Estimation of serum bilirubin level with the
photoelectric colorimeter. J Biol Chem 1937;119:481-4.
32. Vijaya Padma V, Suja R, Shyamala Devi CS. Hepatoprotetive effect
of Liv. 52 on anti-tubercular drug induced hepatotoxicity in rats.
Fitoterapia 1998;6:520.
33. Yuen MF, Kato T, Mizokami M, Chan AO, Yuen JC, Yuan HJ,
et al. Clinical outcome and virologic profiles of severe hepatitis B
exacerbation due to YMDD mutations. J Hepatol 2003;39(5):850-5.
Statistics
207 Views | 483 Downloads
How to Cite
N, H. “COMPARITIVE STUDY OF HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF ACANTHOSPERMUM HISPIDUM PLANT EXTRACT AND HERBAL NIOSOMAL SUSPENSION AGAINST ANTI-TUBERCULAR DRUG INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY IN RATS”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 8, no. 5, Sept. 2015, pp. 256-9, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ajpcr/article/view/7873.
Section
Original Article(s)