THE DEGREE OF SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A IN BURN PATIENTS WITH PROBIOTIC THERAPY

  • LYNDA HARIANI Department of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Airlangga University School of Medicine, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia.
  • IRAWAN WAHYUDI Royal Taruma Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • ISWINARNO DOSOSAPUTRO Department of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Airlangga University School of Medicine, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia.
  • SJAIFUDDIN NOER M Department of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery, Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Airlangga University School of Medicine, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia.

Abstract

Background: One of the problems with burn patients is the impairment of host immunity, which makes difficult to treat. In burns, immunoglobulin
A has demonstrated to decrease. Immunoglobulin A is the main product of mucous immune system, which increases viral clearance and decreases
bacterial adhesion in the intestine. Probiotics consist of living microflora, which control the balance of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the intestine.
Instead of producing organic component, increasing the acidity of intestine, mucin and bacteriocin, they also activate the intestinal immune system
and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). The goal of this study was to propose that regular intake of probiotic might help to improve the mucous
immune system, especially sIgA in intestines in burn patients.
Methods: An experimental, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was carried out in 33 burn patients. Those patients were divided into two groups.
The first group was given daily probiotic and the second group was given only placebo for 10 days. The treatment began on the 4th day admission, and
then, the degree of sIgA was evaluated before treatment and day 14 from fecal specimen.
Results: Significant differences between probiotic and control group were observed (p<0.0001). The degree of sIgA in the probiotic group increased
61.25%, and in the control group, it decreased to 36.80%.
Conclusion: The mucous immune system, especially sIgA, increases by probiotic intake.

Keywords: Probiotics, Mucous immune system, Secretory immunoglobulin A

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HARIANI, L., WAHYUDI, I., DOSOSAPUTRO, I., & NOER M, S. (2019). THE DEGREE OF SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A IN BURN PATIENTS WITH PROBIOTIC THERAPY. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 11(5), 174-176. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2019.v11s5.T1017
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