DYSMENORRHEA MANAGEMENT BY NON-MEDICAL FACULTIES STUDENTS OF UNIVERSITAS MUHAMMADIYAH SURAKARTA IN 2019

  • MARISKA SRI HARLIANTI Department of Pharmaceutics , Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta 57102, Indonesia
  • RATIH DWI WIDIASTUTI Department of Pharmaceutics , Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Muhammadiyah Surakarta 57102, Indonesia

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the dysmenorrhea management by non-medical Faculties Students of Universitas Muhammadiyah
Surakarta through self-medication.
Methods: An observational study with cross-sectional design was conducted across 394 respondents at non-medical Faculties of Universitas
Muhammadiyah Surakarta. Respondents were selected by purposive sampling method. Data were obtained using questionnaire that filled out by
respondents.
Results: Among the 394 respondents, 100% managed dysmenorrhea by non-pharmacological treatment (88.78%, 53.83%, and 42.35% were
sleeping and taking a rest, eating nutritrious food, and compressing with warm water), whereas 160 (40.82%) respondents managed dysmenorrhea
by taking medicines (70.62%, 16.88%, 11.25% and 1.25% were unidentified, over the counter, mandatory drug pharmacy [Obat Wajib Apotek], and
prescription only medicine).
Conclusion: Dysmenorrhea management among non-medical Faculties Students of Universitas Muhammadiyah frequently appropriate. The role of
pharmacists in providing information about medicine used by community was very important because many respondents do not know the names or
brands.

Keywords: Dysmenorrhea, Non-medical faculty, self-medication

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How to Cite
HARLIANTI, M. S., & WIDIASTUTI, R. D. (2021). DYSMENORRHEA MANAGEMENT BY NON-MEDICAL FACULTIES STUDENTS OF UNIVERSITAS MUHAMMADIYAH SURAKARTA IN 2019. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 13(1), 27-29. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2021.v13s1.Y0084
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