PRIMARY PREVENTION OF VERRUCA PLANTARIS THROUGH TOPICAL HERBAL AND VITAMIN DERIVATIVE

  • MARK KEVIN KAUFFMAN DO ACOFP Department of Primary Care, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, Florida
  • MICHELE MARIE ROTH-KAUFFMAN JD Department of Physician, Gannon University, Ruskin, Florida
  • PRATEEK KHURANA Department of Primary Care, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, Florida
  • LORRIE SINIBALDI Department of Primary Care, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, Florida
  • AARON WALKOWSKI Department of Primary Care, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, Florida
  • ANDREW APUGLIESE Department of Primary Care, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, Florida
  • JUNAID ESSA Department of Primary Care, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Bradenton, Florida

Abstract

Objective: Verrucae plantaris (VP) results from environmental exposure to human papillomavirus causing plantar warts of the foot, resistant
to treatment, and high recurrence rates. Current treatment paradigms focus on the treatment of lesions as opposed to primary prophylaxis. We
hypothesize that a topical combination of herbal supplement with anti-viral properties and a vitamin derivative* can be used prophylactically to
decrease the primary incidence.
Methods: We initiated a double-blinded clinical study with participants (n=282) randomization into control (lotion emollient only) (n=120),
treatment (herbal and vitamin derivative) (n=110) and no treatment (NT) (n=52). Participants underwent examination of the feet at baseline (0
months) to exclude VP lesions and were randomized to receive a bottle containing topical lotion with emollient only, control (C), lotion with an herbal
and vitamin derivative, treatment (T), or NT, where participants did not apply anything to their feet. C and T participants applied lotion topically to the
feet once daily and were examined at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months to document the incidence of VP.
Results: No incidence of VP occurred in the T group (0/110=0% incidence), two lesions in the C group (2/120=1.7% incidence), and five lesions in
the NT group (5/52=9.6% incidence).
Conclusion: Treatments for VP rely on treating lesions after they occur, have high degrees of variability in success, risk of continued transmission
during treatment, and have high rates of recurrence. Although the study number is relatively low, early indications show decreasing incidence of
VP from 9.6% in participants with NT to 1.7% in participants who used lotion only, suggesting increased health of the plantar epidermis, and 0%
incidence in those participants applying topical herbal and vitamin derivative*. Additional study with increased numbers of participants is warranted.

Keywords: Verruca plantaris, Human papillomavirus, Plantar wart

References

1. Krishna SK, Jethwa AS. Human papillomavirus infections in adults and
children. Am J Epidemiol Infect Dis 2013;1:11-9.
2. Tlougan BE, Mancini AJ, Mandell JA, Cohen DE, Sanchez MR. Skin
conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: Part
II cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory dermatoses. Sports Med
2011;41:967-84.
3. Kenny T, Harding M. Warts and Verrucas; 2015. Available from: http://
www.patient.info/health/warts-and-verrucas-leaflet. [Last accessed on
2016 Jul 12].
4. Sudhakar GK, Pai V, Pai A, Kamath V. Therapeutic approaches in the
management of plantar warts by human papillomaviruses: A review.
Asian J Biomed Pharm Sci 2013;3:1-4.
5. Plantar Warts. The American College of Foot and Ankle Orthopedics and
Medicine; 2016. Available from: http://www.acfaom.org/informationfor-
patients/common-conditions/plantar-warts. [Last accessed on 2016
Jul 21].
6. Bruggink SC, Eekhof JA, Egberts PF, van Blijswijk SC, Assendelft WJ,
Gussekloo J. Warts transmitted in families and schools: A prospective
cohort. Pediatrics 2013;131:928-34.
7. Warts. American Academy of Dermatology: Excellence in Dermatologic
Surgery; 2016. Available from: https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/
contagious-skin-diseases/warts. [Last accessed on 2016 Jul 22].
8. Watkins P. Identifying and treating plantar warts. Nurs Stand
2006;20:50-4.
9. Lichon V, Khachemoune A. Plantar warts: A focus on treatment
modalities. Dermatol Nurs 2007;19:372-5.
10. Sanclemente G, Gill DK. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and
pathogenesis. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2002;16:231-40.
11. Bruggink SC, Gussekloo J, de Koning MN, Feltkamp MC, Bavinck JN,
Quint WG, et al. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course
and treatment response: Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled
trial. J Clin Virol 2013;57:227-32.
12. Doorbar J, Egawa N, Griffin H, Kranjec C, Murakami I. Human
papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association. Rev Med
Virol 2016;25:2-23.
13. Sterling JC, Gibbs SS, Hussain H, Mustapa MF, Handfield-Jones SE.
British association of dermatologists’ guidelines for the management of
cutaneous warts 2014. Br J Dermatol 2014;171:696-712.
14. Newton H. Viral infections of the skin: Clinical features and treatment
options. Nurs Stand 2013;27:43-7.
15. Treat cutaneous warts on a case-by-case basis, taking into account
patient factors and the available clinical evidence. Drugs Ther Perspec
2012;28:15.
Statistics
62 Views | 63 Downloads
Citations
How to Cite
DO ACOFP, M. K. K., ROTH-KAUFFMAN JD, M. M., KHURANA, P., SINIBALDI, L., WALKOWSKI, A., APUGLIESE, A., & ESSA, J. (2021). PRIMARY PREVENTION OF VERRUCA PLANTARIS THROUGH TOPICAL HERBAL AND VITAMIN DERIVATIVE. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 13(1), 67-68. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2021.v13s1.Y1010
Section
Full Proceeding Paper