ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY PATTERN OF BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE ENVIRONMENT OF INTENSIVE CARE UNIT OF WAD MEDANI EMERGENCY HOSPITAL, GEZIRA STATE, SUDAN

  • WALEED ELSIDDIG MOHAMMED National Health Insurance Fund, Gezira State, Sudan
  • HASSABELRASOUL ELFADIL HASSAN Department of Natural Product and Alternative Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • MIRGHANI ABDELRHMAN YOUSIF Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Gezira, Sudan

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the present study was primarily to identify the sources and types of bacterial contamination associated with hospital-acquired infections in the intensive care unit and to investigate the sensitivity pattern of isolated bacteria to prescribed antibiotics of Wad Medani Emergency Hospital, Gezira State, Sudan.


Methods: A total of 50 swab samples were obtained from 14 different sites, including inanimate objects as well as nurses’ hands in the ICU. Identification of the bacterial isolates was performed utilizing Gram’s staining test and standard biochemical tests; likewise, the respective antimicrobial sensitivity was determined based on the guidelines recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI).


Results: Showed the prevalence of Gram-positive isolates as Coagulase-negative staphylococci (30%), Staphylococcus aureus (20%), Bacillus spp (15%), and Streptococcus spp (4%). On the other hand, the Gram negative isolates were: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%), \Kliebsiella pneumoniae (7%), Proteus mirabilis (5%), and Enterobacter spp.(5%). Floor, Monitors, Patients’ oxygen masks and infusion-stands as well as nurses’ hands, were the most contaminated sites. Staphylococci showed a reasonable sensitivity response to Gentamicin and Vancomycin and high resistance to Erythromycin and Co-trimoxazole; whereas Gram-negative isolates showed high resistance to first and second-generation Cephalosporins and demonstrated good sensitivity pattern to Gentamicin and Meropenem. Pseudomonas aeruginosa also showed reasonable sensitivity to Ciprofloxacin.


Conclusion: Findings of the study demonstrated high bacterial contamination levels in ICU. 

Keywords: Hospital acquired infections, Intensive Care Unit, Contamination, Environment

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MOHAMMED, W. E., H. E. HASSAN, and M. A. YOUSIF. “ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY PATTERN OF BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE ENVIRONMENT OF INTENSIVE CARE UNIT OF WAD MEDANI EMERGENCY HOSPITAL, GEZIRA STATE, SUDAN”. International Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 12, no. 5, Sept. 2020, pp. 82-85, doi:10.22159/ijcpr.2020v12i5.39772.
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