EFFICACY OF OTAGO EXERCISE VERSUS BOSU BALL EXERCISE IN BALANCE-IMPAIRED ELDERLY PEOPLE

  • PAVITHRALOCHANI V Department of Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • REBECCA SANDHIYA D Department of Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • VIJAY P Department of Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • MAJITHA PARVEEN M Department of Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the effect of OTAGO exercise and BOSU ball exercise on balance training among geriatric population. Geriatric indicates the elderly people with age group more than 60. Balance is the state of equilibrium; three sensors drive a sense of balance (vision, proprioception, and vestibular). As the age increases, there will be some degenerative changes, the loss of any one of these systems affects balance which may result in falls and increased morbidity. The study focuses on the effectiveness of OTAGO exercise and BOSU ball exercise in elderly people.


Methodology: Thirty subjects were selected and divided into two groups based on selection criteria with age group between 60-70, both male and female, people who scored 35–45 in Berg balance scale (BBS) grading test and four in fall risk assessment questionnaire was included and people with recent fracture and surgery, stroke, parkinson’s disease, psychiatric illness, severe pain, and muscle weakness were excluded from the study. Pre-test was done using BBS as an outcome measure, proceeding with treatment protocol; Group A: received BOSU ball exercise (unilateral heel raise, one leg stand, knee bend, split stance with torso rotation, and marching) for 30 min – each set of exercise was given for 5–8 repetition with rest period of 2 min. Group B received OTAGO exercise (Backward walking, sideways walking, toe walking, sit to stand, and one leg stand) for 30 min – each set of exercise was given for 5–8 repetition with rest period of 2 min. After the cessation of the treatment protocol, post-test was done using the same outcome measure.


Results: Result of the study proves that each group shows p value (p≤0.001); however, Group A (BOSU ball exercise) shows more significant improvement than Group B (OTAGO exercise).


Conclusion: Conclusion of the study shows that both BOSU ball exercise and OTAGO exercise were effective in improving balance among elderly people. However, BOSU ball exercise was better than OTAGO exercise in improving balance among elderly people.

Keywords: Balance, Elderly, Berg balance scale, BOSU ball, OTAGO exercise

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V, P., SANDHIYA D, R., P, V., & PARVEEN M, M. (2020). EFFICACY OF OTAGO EXERCISE VERSUS BOSU BALL EXERCISE IN BALANCE-IMPAIRED ELDERLY PEOPLE. Innovare Journal of Medical Sciences, 8(6), 25-28. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijms.2020.v8i6.38989
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