SIMILE BETWEEN THE MODUS OPERANDI OF ANALGESIA OF TRAMADOL AND POISON OAK (RHUS TOXICODENDRON) ON FIBROMYALGIA


Suman Bagchi, Suman Halder, Shubhamoy Ghosh, Mousumi Roy

Abstract


Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event.

Women are much more likely to develop fibromyalgia than are men. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression.

Fibromyalgia is one of the most common chronic pain conditions. The disorder affects an estimated 10 million people in the U.S. and an estimated 3-6% of the world population. While it is most prevalent in women - 75-90 percent of the people who have fibromyalgia are women - it also occurs in men and children of all ethnic groups. The disorder is often seen in families, among siblings or mothers and their children. The diagnosis is usually made between the ages of 20 to 50 years, but the incidence rises with age so that by age 80, approximately 8% of adults meet the American College of Rheumatology classification of fibromyalgia.

While there is no cure for fibromyalgia, a variety of medications can help control symptoms. In general, treatments for fibromyalgia include both medication and self-care. The emphasis is on minimizing symptoms and improving general health. Medications can help reduce the pain of fibromyalgia and improve sleep. Common choices include: Analgesics (Tramadol). In this article we like to discuss on the similarity of action between the analgesic medicine (Tramadol) and the homoeopathic medicine Poison oak (Rhus toxicodendron) on fibromyalgia from the aetiopathogenetic point of view. Poison oak, a wild growing plant of the anacardiacea family is widely distributed and easily accessible and also a very common Homoeopathic remedy as Rhus toxicodendron.


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About this article

Title

SIMILE BETWEEN THE MODUS OPERANDI OF ANALGESIA OF TRAMADOL AND POISON OAK (RHUS TOXICODENDRON) ON FIBROMYALGIA

Date

14-01-2015

Additional Links

Manuscript Submission

Journal

Innovare Journal of Medical Sciences
Vol 3 Issue 1 2015 ( January - March ) Page: 1-3

Online ISSN

2321-4406

Statistics

396 Views | 210 Downloads

Authors & Affiliations

Suman Bagchi
MD (Homoeopathy), SRF(H) at Dr. Anjali Chatterjee Regional Research Institute(H), Kolkata – 700035
India

Suman Halder
MD (Homoeopathy), SRF(H) at Dr. Anjali Chatterjee Regional Research Institute(H), Kolkata – 700035; Ex- Assistant Professor of Community Medicine, P.C.M. Homoeopathic Hospital and College, Kolkata
India

Shubhamoy Ghosh
MD (Homoeopathy), Head, department of Pathology & Microbiology, Mahesh Bhattacharyya Homoeopathic Medical College & Hospital (Govt. of W.B.)
India

Mousumi Roy
BHMS, HMO at Chhurra, Raipur(Chattishgarh).
India


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