THE CORRELATION BETWEEN FRAMINGHAM RISK SCORE AND THE CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS THAT MEASURE FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY AND DISEASE ACTIVITY IN IRAQI PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

  • Khalid A Ameer Clinical Pharmacy Department -College of pharmacy –Baghdad University
  • Samer I Mohammed Clinical Pharmacy Department -College of pharmacy –Baghdad University

Abstract

Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have increased morbidity and mortality from premature cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Framingham risk score (FRS) is a simplified coronary prediction tool developed to enable clinicians to assess the risk of a cardiovascular event and to identify candidate patients for risk factors modifications worldwide. The predictive ability of the FRS varies between populations, ethnic groups, and socio-economic status. The aim of this study is to find if there is any correlation between the Framingham risk score and the inflammatory and biochemical parameters used to measure disease activity and functional ability in Iraqi patients with active RA.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the rheumatology outpatient unit of Baghdad Teaching Hospital, from September 2012 to April 2013. A total of 140 patients (40 males and 100 females) with active RA were involved in this study. Disease activity was measured by disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28) and the simplified disease activity index (SDAI); whereas functional status of the patients were measured using The patient reported outcomes measurement information System (PROMIS HAQ) score. The FRS was calculated using a computerized formula from the web. Then the correlation between FRS with clinical parameters (DAS28, SDAI and PROMIS HAQ), plus the biochemical parameter (hsCRP, TNF and ESR) was determined.

Result: There was a significant positive correlation between FRS and both of (DAS28 and SDAI). Additionally FRS was significantly correlated with each of (TNF, ESR and hsCRP).

Conclusion: We found a significant correlation between FRS and the two most important methods used to measure disease activity (DAS28 and SDAI) but to obtain more significant result with other clinical parameter, long-term prospective studies with a larger sample size are needed.

 

Keywords: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Framingham risk score (FRS)

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Author Biographies

Khalid A Ameer, Clinical Pharmacy Department -College of pharmacy –Baghdad University
clinical laboratory sciences/ baghdad univercity
Samer I Mohammed, Clinical Pharmacy Department -College of pharmacy –Baghdad University
Clinical Pharmacy Department -College of pharmacy –Baghdad University

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Ameer, K. A., and S. I. Mohammed. “THE CORRELATION BETWEEN FRAMINGHAM RISK SCORE AND THE CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS THAT MEASURE FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY AND DISEASE ACTIVITY IN IRAQI PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 6, no. 9, 1, pp. 384-6, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/2413.
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