TRACKING THE ORGANOLEPTIC AND BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE AYURVEDIC POLYHERBAL AND NATIVE FERMENTED TRADITIONAL MEDICINES: BALARISHTA AND CHANDANASAVA

  • Annadurai Vinothkanna Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.
  • Subbiah Mariappan Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.
  • Soundarapandian Sekar Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.

Abstract

Objective: Ayurvedic formulary contains fermented polyherbal medicines which includes Balarishta and Chandanasava. The changes occurring in the successive stages of fermentation of these medicines are least understood such as organoleptic and biochemical parameters.

Methods: The samples were collected from a manufacturing unit. The sensory evalution of color, smell, touch and taste was carried out. Biochemical estimations, GC-MS analysis, estimation of aflatoxins and heavy metals were performed.

Results: The native fermentation led to browning with herbal odouration and sour taste in both Balarishta and Chandanasava preparations. pH was drastically reduced to acidic in Balarishta when compared to Chandanasava. Total solids drastically reduced in Chandanasava than in Balarishta. In both medicament fermentations, total sugar gradually decreased with concomitant increase in ethanol. Formation of acetic acid, gradual decrease in aminoacid and starch contents signify the fermentation process. Both Balarishta and Chandanasava were devoid of methanol, aflatoxins and heavy metals like mercury, lead and cadmium.

Conclusion: Preparation of Ayurvedic fermented medicines exemplified by Balarishta and Chandanasava are earmarked with major changes in organoleptic and biochemical parameters and are found safe by the absence of toxic components assessed.

 

Keywords: Ayurveda, Balarishta, Chandanasava, Polyherbal fermentation, Sugar utilization, Starch utilization, Ethanol, Aflatoxins, Heavy metals.

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Author Biographies

Annadurai Vinothkanna, Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.
Research Scholar, Department of Industrial Biotechnology
Subbiah Mariappan, Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.
Department of Industrial Biotechnology
Soundarapandian Sekar, Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu, India.
Professor, Department of Industrial Biotechnology

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How to Cite
Vinothkanna, A., S. Mariappan, and S. Sekar. “TRACKING THE ORGANOLEPTIC AND BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE AYURVEDIC POLYHERBAL AND NATIVE FERMENTED TRADITIONAL MEDICINES: BALARISHTA AND CHANDANASAVA”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 6, no. 9, 1, pp. 521-6, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/2600.
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