FRUIT PEEL EXTRACTS WITH POTENTIAL FOR DISSOLVING SIMULATED RENAL STONES IN IN VITRO CONDITIONS

  • Karuna Sree Varicola Associate Professor, Head of the Department, Department of Pharmacognosy, KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vijayawada,
  • Amreen Siddiqua A. KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pinnamaneni Polyclinic Road, Siddhartha Nagar, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Keerthi Dintyala KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pinnamaneni Polyclinic Road, Siddhartha Nagar, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Gandhi Ventrapati KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pinnamaneni Polyclinic Road, Siddhartha Nagar, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the antiurolithiatic activity of selected fruit peels on simulated renal stones in in vitro conditions.

Methods: Simulated renal stones were prepared by homogenous precipitation method. The criterion selected was to estimate the amount of calcium oxalate remaining in the semi-permeable membranes by Kramer and Tisdal method with slight modification. A suitable media was provided by TRIS buffer.

Results: The crude methanol extract of Musa sapientum exhibited highest dissolution of calcium oxalate ie.9.15 mg and the percent dissolved was found to be 91.5% in comparison to Malus pumila methanol extract which dissolved 8.96 mg (89.6%) and Punica granatum methanol extract which dissolved 8.0 mg (80.0%). Its activity was comparable with that of standard drug Tamsulosin hydrochloride (400 mg) with a percentage dissolved of about 90.5%.

Conclusion: Experimental evidence showed that methanol and aqueous fruit peel extracts of Musa sapientum, Malus pumila, and Punica granatum possess potential antiurolithiatic activity. Their effect is found to be significant and the extracts can be used in the treatment of lithiasis.

Keywords: Herbal medicine, Calcium oxalate, Homogenous precipitation, TRIS buffer, Antiurolithiathic activity

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Author Biography

Karuna Sree Varicola, Associate Professor, Head of the Department, Department of Pharmacognosy, KVSR Siddhartha College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vijayawada,

Pharmacognosy,

Associate Professor

Head of the Department

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Varicola, K. S., A. S. A., K. Dintyala, and G. Ventrapati. “FRUIT PEEL EXTRACTS WITH POTENTIAL FOR DISSOLVING SIMULATED RENAL STONES IN IN VITRO CONDITIONS”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 10, no. 11, Nov. 2018, pp. 74-77, doi:10.22159/ijpps.2018v10i11.27862.
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