PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF ACACIA NILOTICA (BARK) AGAINST ANTI TUBERCULAR DRUG INDUCED HEPATIC DAMAGE AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

  • Pritt Verma Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, CSIR- National Botanical Research Institute, (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) Rana Pratap Marg, Post Box No. 436, Lucknow-226001, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • S P Singh Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, CSIR- National Botanical Research Institute, (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) Rana Pratap Marg, Post Box No. 436, Lucknow-226001, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • S K Vind Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, CSIR- National Botanical Research Institute, (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) Rana Pratap Marg, Post Box No. 436, Lucknow-226001, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • G Rajesh Kumar Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, CSIR- National Botanical Research Institute, (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) Rana Pratap Marg, Post Box No. 436, Lucknow-226001, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Chandana Venkateswara Rao Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, CSIR- National Botanical Research Institute, (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) Rana Pratap Marg, Post Box No. 436, Lucknow-226001, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Objective: Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (Bark) against anti tubercular drugs induced hepatic damage an experimental study.

Methods: Rats were divided into five different groups (n=6), the group I served as a control, Group II received Isoniazid-INH and rifampicin-RIF(50mg/kg) in sterile water, group III and IV served as treatment and received 200,400 mg/kg of 50% ethonolic extract of A. nilotica, and group V served as standard group and received silymarin (100mg/kg). All the treatments were given for 10-28 days and after rats were euthenised, blood and liver was collected for biochemical and histopathological studies, respectively.

Results: The 50% ethanolic bark extract of A. nilotica (200, 400 mg/kg p. o.) showed the remarkable hepatoprotective effect against Isoniazid-INH and rifampicin-RIF induced hepatic damage, and observed that it shows no any significant change in a normal posture, behavior and body weight in Wistar rats. The degree of protection was measured by biochemical and antioxidant parameters such as serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, and the histopathological profile of liver also indicated the hepatoprotective nature of this drug.

Conclusion: The bark extracts of A. nilotica has showed dose dependent activity, among which at the dose level of 200 & 400 mg/kg. The further investigations, the bark extract of Acacia nilotica identify the active constituents responsible for hepatoprotection.

 

Keywords: A. nilotica, Antioxidant, Isoniazid-INH, Rifampicin-RIF, Silymarin.

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Verma, P., S. P. Singh, S. K. Vind, G. R. Kumar, and C. V. Rao. “PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF ACACIA NILOTICA (BARK) AGAINST ANTI TUBERCULAR DRUG INDUCED HEPATIC DAMAGE AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 6, no. 9, 1, pp. 75-79, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/3202.
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