COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTICONVULSANT EFFECT OF THE LEAVES OF SAPINDUS EMARGINATUS AND ACORUS CALAMUS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ANIMAL MODELS OF EPILEPSY

  • PRIYADARSHINI SHOUGRAKPAM Department of Pharmacology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, India 795004
  • ABHISHEK BHATTACHARJEE Department of Pharmacology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, India 795004
  • NGANGOM GUNINDRO Department of Pharmacology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, India 795004
  • SANJENBAM RITA Department of Pharmacology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, India 795004

Abstract

Objective: To compare anticonvulsant activity of methanol extracts of Sapindus emarginatus (MESE) and Acorus calamus (MEAC) in experimental seizure models in mice.


Methods: Hind limb tonic extension (HLTE) in Maximal electroshock (MES) seizure and clonic seizure in Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure models were assessed. Group I (control) mice received 1% gum acacia in distilled water (1 ml/100 g). Topiramate (50 mg/kg) was administered in group II (standard) animals. Group III and IV mice were treated with 200 and 400 mg/kg of MESE, respectively. Mice in group V and VI were given MEAC at the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. Drugs were given orally suspended in 1% gum acacia suspension (1 ml/100 g) for 7 d. Next day after 1 h of drug administration, the seizure was induced for evaluation.


Results: Anticonvulsant property of both extracts was confirmed by reduction (p<0.001) in HLTE phase in MES model; delayed onset of the clonic seizure (p<0.001) and its shortened phase (p<0.001) in PTZ model when compared with the control. MESE-200 mg/kg produced significantly longer (p<0.001) HLTE phase with lower protection (40.34%) among the different doses of the extracts. Clonic seizure onsets and durations in PTZ model were comparable among the different extract-treated groups; however, mortality was higher (66.6%) with MESE-200 mg/kg.


Conclusion: Anticonvulsant activity of MESE and MEAC was evident; however, MESE at the dose of 200 mg/kg was less effective.

Keywords: Anticonvulsant, Maximal electric shock, Pentylenetetrazol, Sapindus emarginatus, Acorus calamus

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SHOUGRAKPAM, P., A. BHATTACHARJEE, N. GUNINDRO, and S. RITA. “COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTICONVULSANT EFFECT OF THE LEAVES OF SAPINDUS EMARGINATUS AND ACORUS CALAMUS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ANIMAL MODELS OF EPILEPSY”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 13, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 36-39, doi:10.22159/ijpps.2021v13i1.39872.
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