INHIBITIVE ACTIVITY OF 17 MARINE ALGAE FROM THE COAST OF EL JADIDA-MOROCCO AGAINST ERWINIA CHRYSANTHEMI

  • Fatima Lakhdar Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Environment, Faculty of Science, University Chouaib Doukkali, BP 20, El Jadida, Morocco,
  • Nabila Boujaber Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Environment, Faculty of Science, University Chouaib Doukkali, BP 20, El Jadida, Morocco
  • Khadija Oumaskour Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Environment, Faculty of Science, University Chouaib Doukkali, BP 20, El Jadida, Morocco
  • Omar Assobhei University Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2202, Fez-Morocco
  • Samira Etahiri Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Environment, Faculty of Science, University Chouaib Doukkali, BP 20, El Jadida, Morocco

Abstract

Objective: The objective of our work was to search for a new biopesticides extracted from marine algae found on the coast of El Jadida, Sidi Bouzid-Morocco.

Methods: Extracts of 17 species of algae (Rhodophyceae, Rhodophyceae, Chlorophyceae) collected from the coast of El Jadida, Morocco, were tested for their antibacterial activity against the bacterial strain Erwinia chrysanthemi that causes soft rot in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

Results: Of the 17 species studied, those belonging to the Phaeophyceae and Rhodophyceae were the most active, while Chlorophyceae have a low inhibition. Maximum inhibition of the growth of Erwinia chrysanthemi was obtained by extracts prepared in dichloromethane and methanol, and by dichloromethane extract. No activity was observed in the aqueous extracts.

Conclusion: The results obtained in this study clearly indicated that macroalgae from the coast of Sidi Bouzid can be used in the treatment of plant diseases especially soft rot of potato.

 

Keywords: Antibacterial Activity, Erwinia chrysanthemi, Potato, Algae, El Jadida (Sidi Bouzid, Morocco)

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Author Biography

Fatima Lakhdar, Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Environment, Faculty of Science, University Chouaib Doukkali, BP 20, El Jadida, Morocco,
PhD student in the university of chouaib doukkali, Faculty of science el Jadida, Morocco.

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How to Cite
Lakhdar, F., N. Boujaber, K. Oumaskour, O. Assobhei, and S. Etahiri. “INHIBITIVE ACTIVITY OF 17 MARINE ALGAE FROM THE COAST OF EL JADIDA-MOROCCO AGAINST ERWINIA CHRYSANTHEMI”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 7, no. 11, Sept. 2015, pp. 376-80, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/7653.
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