SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES AND NANOSTRUCTURED LIPID CARRIERS OF TOLNAFTATE: DESIGN, OPTIMIZATION AND IN-VITRO EVALUATION

  • Mona M. Abousamra Pharmaceutical Technology Department, National Research Centre, El-Buhouth Street, Dokki, Giza 12622, Egypt
  • Amira M. Mohsen National Research Centre, El-Buhouth Street

Abstract

Objective: The target of our work is the preparation of tolnaftate (TOL) loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) as well as nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs).

Methods: The high shear homogenization method was chosen for the preparation of nanoparticles. The nanoparticle dispersions were prepared using Compritol 888ATO, Tefose 63, Miglyol® 812, Poloxamer188, and Tween80. Particle size (PS), zeta potential (ZP), polydispersity index (PDI), drug entrapment efficiency (EE) and in vitro release study were determined. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis and morphological transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination were conducted. A stability study for 3 mo was performed.

Results: The results revealed that NLC and SLN dispersions had spherical shapes with an average size between 41.10±1.92 nm and 98.85±1.01 nm. High entrapment efficiency was obtained with negatively charged zeta potential with PDI value ranging from 0.251±0.012 to 0.759±0.028. The release profiles of all formulations were characterized by a sustained release behavior over 24 h and the release rates increased as the amount of liquid lipid in lipid core increased. Tolnaftate loaded NLC showed more stability than its corresponding SLN.

Conclusion: It can be fulfilled from this work that NLCs may represent a promising carrier for tolnaftate delivery offering both sustained release and stability.

 

Keywords: Tolnaftate, Solid lipid nanoparticles, Nanostructured lipid carriers, Tefose 63

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How to Cite
Abousamra, M. M., and A. M. Mohsen. “SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES AND NANOSTRUCTURED LIPID CARRIERS OF TOLNAFTATE: DESIGN, OPTIMIZATION AND IN-VITRO EVALUATION”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 8, no. 1, Dec. 2015, pp. 380-5, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/9016.
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