COPING STRATEGIES OF CHILDREN FROM DIVORCED FAMILIES IN NORTH-WESTERN ETHIOPIA

  • NEGA GEDEFAW AGMASE School of Sociology and Social Work, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, College of Social Science and the Humanities, University of Gondar, Ethiopia.

Abstract

Objective: Since children from divorced families suffered from multi-dimensional effects of divorce and those children are more likely to be involved in different income generating activities. This study attempted to investigate the coping strategies of children from divorced families in North-Western Ethiopia.


Methods: The qualitative, specifically phenomenological research design was employed for understanding the lived experiences of children from divorced families. The data were collected from children of a divorced family and experts through in-depth interviews, focus group discussion, and key informant interviews. Then, participants of the study were selected using the snowball sampling technique. As well, the collected data analyzed and interpreted thematically to address the aforementioned objective of the study.


Results: The findings of the study reveal that children from divorced families developed a wide range of survival strategies within the face of challenges and difficulties that support their life on their own such as petty business, Shoeshine, labor activities, delinquent activities, and begging.


Conclusion: The study concluded that the problem of divorce needs appropriate attention from governmental and non-governmental organizations as well as social institutions akin to family and religion.

Keywords: Coping strategies, Children, Divorced families, Ethiopia

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GEDEFAW AGMASE, N. (2021). COPING STRATEGIES OF CHILDREN FROM DIVORCED FAMILIES IN NORTH-WESTERN ETHIOPIA. Innovare Journal of Social Sciences, 9(2), 5-9. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijss.2021.v9i2.41038
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Original Article(s)