EFFECT OF HYDROPHILIC AND HYDROPHOBIC POLYMER MATRIX ON THE TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY OF ETHINYLESTRADIOL AND MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE

  • Shikha Baghel Chauhan Department of Pharmaceutics, Amity Institute of Pharmacy, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Tanveer Naved Department of Pharmaceutics, Amity Institute of Pharmacy, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Nayyar Parvez Department of Pharmacy, School of Medical and Allied Sciences, Galgotias University, Greater Noida, UP, India

Abstract

Objective: The aims of the present study were to develop different matrix patches with various ratios of hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymer combinations such as ethyl cellulose (EC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and eudragit RL 100 (ERL) and eudragit RS 100 (ERS) containing ethinylestradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate and to perform physicochemical characterization and in vitro permeation studies through rat skin.

Methods: Six formulations (F1 to F6) were developed by varying the concentration of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymer and keeping the drug load constant. Physical parameters and drug excipient interaction studies were evaluated in all the formulations. In vitro, skin permeation profiles of ethinylestradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate from various formulations were simultaneously characterized in a thermostatically controlled modified Franz Diffusion cell. The physicochemical compatibility of the drug and the polymers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry.

Results: The results suggested no physicochemical incompatibility between the drug and the polymers. In vitro permeation studies were performed by using Franz diffusion cells, patches coded as F3 (ethyl cellulose: polyvinylpyrrolidone, 7.5:2.5) and F6 (eudragit RL 100 (ERL) and eudragit RS 100 (ERS), 8:2) can be chosen for further in vivo studies. The results followed Higuchi kinetics (r = 0.9953-0.9979), and the mechanism of release was diffusion mediated. Based on physicochemical and in vitro skin permeation studies of 85.64% (for F3) and 88.62% (for F6) of ethinylestradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate.

Conclusion: The developed transdermal patches are stable, non-irritating and had increased efficacy of ethinylestradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate and therefore had a good potential for antifertility treatment.

Keywords: Transdermal, Antifertility, Ethinylestradiol, Medroxyprogesterone acetate, Polyvinylpyrrolidone, Ethylcellulose, Eudragit RL 100 (ERL) and eudragit RS 100 (ERS)

References

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Chauhan, S. B., Naved, T., & Parvez, N. (2019). EFFECT OF HYDROPHILIC AND HYDROPHOBIC POLYMER MATRIX ON THE TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY OF ETHINYLESTRADIOL AND MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 11(1), 210-215. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2019v11i1.29886
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