KIDNEY INJURY MOLECULE-1 AS AN EARLY AMIKACIN-INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY MARKER IN PATIENTS WITH SEPSIS HOSPITALIZED IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

  • TRISNI UNTARI DEWI Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta.
  • INSTIATY . Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta
  • RUDIANTO SEDONO Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta
  • GESTINA ALISKA Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta
  • MUHAMMAD KHIFZHON AZWAR Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta
  • RIANTO SETIABUDY Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta.

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to determine the correlation between trough plasma amikacin concentrations and urinary normalized kidney injury
molecule-1 (KIM-1) concentrations as an early biomarker of nephrotoxicity in patients with sepsis who are hospitalized in an intensive care unit.
Methods: In this pilot study, 12 patients with sepsis were treated with amikacin 1000 mg/day between May 2015 and September 2015. The correlation
between trough plasma amikacin concentrations measured after the third dose and the elevation of urinary normalized KIM-1 concentrations after
the third amikacin dose relative to the first/second dose was evaluated.
Results: In total, three patients had trough plasma amikacin concentrations exceeding the safe level (>10 μg/ml). Furthermore, eight patients
displayed higher normalized KIM-1 concentrations after third dose than after the first/second dose; however, there was no correlation between
trough amikacin concentrations and the elevation of urinary normalized KIM-1 concentrations (r=0.3, p=0.3).
Conclusion: The study results illustrated that short-term treatment with an amikacin dose of 1000 mg/day was generally safe in patients with sepsis.

Keywords: Amikacin, Kidney injury molecule-1, Nephrotoxicity

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DEWI, T. U., ., I., SEDONO, R., ALISKA, G., AZWAR, M. K., & SETIABUDY, R. (2019). KIDNEY INJURY MOLECULE-1 AS AN EARLY AMIKACIN-INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY MARKER IN PATIENTS WITH SEPSIS HOSPITALIZED IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 11(1), 277-279. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2019.v11s1.031
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