DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF REVERSED PHASE HPLC-PDA METHOD FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF CHRYSIN IN SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES

  • ANUJ GARG Institute of Pharmaceutical Research, GLA University, 17 Km Stone, NH-2, Mathura-Delhi Road, P. O. Chaumuhan, Mathura 281406, (U. P.) India
  • GOPAL PRASAD AGRAWAL Institute of Pharmaceutical Research, GLA University, 17 Km Stone, NH-2, Mathura-Delhi Road, P. O. Chaumuhan, Mathura 281406, (U. P.) India
  • SHAHADALI K. National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), ITI Compound, Raebareli 229010, (U. P.) India

Abstract

Objective: The main aim of the present study was to develop and validate a simple, precise and accurate Reversed-Phase HPLC-PDA method for the quantitative determination of Chrysin in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs).


Methods: The RP-HPLC-PDA system equipped with a C-18 reversed-phase column (250 × 4.6 mm, particle size 5 μm) was employed in the present study. HPLC grade methanol and water in 85:15 (v/v) ratio was selected as the mobile phase at flow rate of 1 ml/min under an ambient column oven temperature. The detection wavelength was kept at 268 nm. Validation of developed method was performed according to the ICH guidelines.


Results: The developed reversed-phase HPLC-PDA method was found to be linear in the concentration range of 0.2-10 µg/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The method was also observed to be precise with % relative standard deviation (RSD) below 2%. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of this method were found to be 0.05µg/ml and 0.14µg/ml, respectively. The percent recovery of the developed method was estimated to more than 99%.


Conclusion: The developed HPLC method can be utilized for the determination of Chrysin with a high degree of accuracy, precision, robustness, specificity in solid lipid nanoparticles in the presence of excipients.

Keywords: Chrysin, Solid Lipid Nanoparticle, Quantitative Analysis, Isocratic Reverse Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC)

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GARG, A., AGRAWAL, G. P., & K., S. (2019). DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF REVERSED PHASE HPLC-PDA METHOD FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF CHRYSIN IN SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 11(5), 324-328. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2019v11i5.33904
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