THE EFFECT OF THE ALTITUDE ZONE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION FOR MALE PILOTS IN INDOCTRINATION AND AEROPHYSIOLOGY TRAINING IN 2019

Authors

  • DEBY HERATIKA Aviation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • ARIA KEKALIH Department of Community Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • WAWAN MULYAWAN The Indonesian Air Force of Aviation Medicine, dr. Saryanto Institute, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • AMILYA AGUSTINA Aviation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • DEWI SUMARYANI SOEMARKO Department of Community Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • MINARMA SIAGIAN Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2020.v12s3.39460

Keywords:

Altitude, Cognitive Function, Hypoxia, Pilot

Abstract

Objective: A pilot on duty at altitude can be exposed to hypoxia, both mild and severe. The incidence of hypoxia on a flight can be fatal, especially if hypoxia is experienced by a pilot on duty. One manifestation of hypoxia is decreased cognitive function. A pilot is required to carry out multitasking operations using cognitive functions, especially in an emergency. Therefore, decreased cognitive function due to hypoxia in a pilot can cause accidents in flight. This study aims to determine changes in cognitive function with hypoxia exposure at several altitude zones.

Methods: This study used an experimental one-group pretest-posttest design. The subjects were 31 military pilots who participated in Indoctrination and Aerophysiology Training. Subjects filled 6 Cognitive Impairment Test (6 CIT) questionnaires at ground level, efficient physiological zone (10,000 ft), and physiological deficient zone (25,000 ft) in a hypobaric chamber.

Results: There was a change of 6 CIT score at 10.000 ft compared to ground level (Friedman post-hoc Wilcoxon, P = 0.001). There was also a change of 6 CIT score at 25,000 ft compared to ground level (Friedman post-hoc Wilcoxon, P<0.001).

Conclusion: There was a change in cognitive function in the efficient physiological zone and physiological deficient zone, compared to ground level.

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Published

15-10-2020

How to Cite

HERATIKA, D., KEKALIH, A., MULYAWAN, W., AGUSTINA, A., SOEMARKO, D. S., & SIAGIAN, M. (2020). THE EFFECT OF THE ALTITUDE ZONE ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION FOR MALE PILOTS IN INDOCTRINATION AND AEROPHYSIOLOGY TRAINING IN 2019. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 12(3), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2020.v12s3.39460

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Full Proceeding Paper

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