RELEVANT TOPICS FOR EDUCATION MODULES ON HEALTHY EATING DURING PREGNANCY IN THE CONTEXT OF INDONESIA

  • ARIESKA MALIA NOVIA PUTRI Department of Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia–Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • DIAN NOVITA CHANDRA Department of Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia–Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • RETNO ASTI WERDHANI Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia–Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
  • SAPTAWATI BARDOSONO Department of Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia–Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia

Abstract

Objective: Nutrition in pregnant women influences fetal and maternal health. Nutrition education is used to improve the nutritional status of pregnant women, but currently, there are no guidelines available for this demographic in Indonesia. Therefore, this qualitative study aims to identify topics relevant to healthy eating in pregnant women in Jakarta, Indonesia.


Methods: The mixed-methods approach included an online survey to understand the problems (relevant to healthy eating) that pregnant women face and the subjects that they lack information about and a review of the relevant literature. The information obtained from both sources was analyzed by a panel of experts with the multi-step Delphi technique, and a list of relevant topics was created.


Results: The study was conducted from April to September 2019 and included 37 pregnant women and 10 experts in nutrition and obstetrics-gynecology. The 13 relevant topics identified were: (1) importance of healthy eating during pregnancy; (2) food groups and serving sizes; (3) nutrition requirements during pregnancy and use of multivitamins/supplements; (4) foods to be restricted or avoided; (5) substances to be restricted or avoided; (6) weight gain during pregnancy; (7) physical activity requirements; (8) tips for ensuring the safety of food; (9) menu containing healthy foods for pregnant women; (10) pregnancy problems related to eating patterns and solutions; (11) healthy eating tips for women with special conditions; (12) myths and facts about eating patterns during pregnancy; and (13) healthy eating for lactation.


Conclusion: These topics would be useful for the creation of nutritional education material for pregnant women in Indonesia.

Keywords: Healthy eating, Module development, Pregnancy, Qualitative study

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PUTRI, A. M. N., CHANDRA, D. N., WERDHANI, R. A., & BARDOSONO, S. (2020). RELEVANT TOPICS FOR EDUCATION MODULES ON HEALTHY EATING DURING PREGNANCY IN THE CONTEXT OF INDONESIA. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 12(3), 58-62. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2020.v12s3.39475
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