ANTIDIABETIC POTENTIAL OF THE OYSTER MUSHROOM PLEUROTUS FLORIDA (MONT.) SINGER

  • Prabu M. Department of Biology, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram 624302 Dindigul (TN), India
  • Kumuthakalavalli R. Department of Biology, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram 624302 Dindigul (TN), India

Abstract

Objective: The present investigation comprises, in vitro antidiabetic activity such as α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities and in vivo antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract of Pleurotus florida.

Methods: The fruiting bodies of Pleurotus florida were obtained from Mushroom Unit, Department of Biology, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu, India. Sample preparation, qualitative phytochemical analysis, in vitro antidiabetic activities namely α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and in vivo antidiabetic activity namely evaluation of alloxan induced diabetic rats were carried out following the methods reported previously.

Results: In vitro and in vivo antidiabetic activity of P. florida exhibited significant results for its α-amylase (94.93±1.75 % at 1000 µg/ml) and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (84.90±0.42 % at 1000 µg/ml) in a dose-dependent manner. The extract also showed significant antidiabetic activity on in vivo (p<0.05) at the tested dose level (200 mg/kg b. w) this was comparable to Glibenclamide, a standard antidiabetic drug.

Conclusion: The presence of phytochemicals namely phenols, flavonoids, saponins, tannins and terpenoids may be responsible for such antidiabetic activity. These results reveal that P. florida can be used as a potential antidiabetic agent.

Keywords: Pleurotus florida, Phenols, Flavonoids, Antidiabetic activity, Antidiabetic agent

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How to Cite
M., P., and K. R. “ANTIDIABETIC POTENTIAL OF THE OYSTER MUSHROOM PLEUROTUS FLORIDA (MONT.) SINGER”. International Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 9, no. 4, July 2017, pp. 51-54, doi:10.22159/ijcpr.2017v9i4.20765.
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