INFLUENCE OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS ON SECONDARY METABOLITE PRODUCTION BY MARINE FUNGI


Anuhya G., Jyostna V., Aswani Kumar Yvv, Bodaiah B., Sudhakar P.

Abstract


Objective: Our study aimed to characterize and optimize the physico-chemical properties which render the high yield of bioactive secondary metabolites from marine fungi and its antibacterial activity against clinical pathogens.

Methods: Bioactive secondary metabolites extracted from marine fungi of Nijampatnam mangroves, Guntur district Andhra Pradesh, India. By using different solvent systems, secondary metabolite was screened for antimicrobial activity against clinical pathogen, Optimization of cultural conditions for maximizing the yield of biomass and compared the yield in different broth media and minimum inhibitory concentration of the optimised compound done for both compounds.

Results: fungal extracts GAPS-1 and GAPS-2 was affectively extracted in ethyl acetate. Isolated compound showed antibacterial activity highest zone of inhibition against E. coli and least to Pseudomonas. Maximum yield of the compound was achieved in modified potato dextrose broth (PDB) medium containing 20% w/v Potato 2% w/v Dextrose broth containing1% w/v glucose and sucrose,1% w/v beef extract and ammonium chloride and 0.01 % mineral salts(MGSO4 and MNSO4) at 25 °C and 30 °C and pH 7.0 and 8.0 with 144 h of incubation period. The yield was observed maximum in potato dextrose broth compared to czapek dox broth, sabaraud’s broth and nutrient broth and minimum inhibitory concentration of the optimized compound ranges from 250 μg for gaps-1 and 300 μg for gaps-2.

Conclusion: Secondary metabolite yield maximum in potato dextrose broth and its potential anti-bacterial activity needs further investigation for pharmaceutical applications.


Keywords


Secondary metabolite, Anti bacterial activity, Optimization

| PDF | HTML | PDF |

References


Zhang J, Li YT, Yong JL, Li MC, Yan JM, Li SZ, et al. Anthracenedione derivatives as anticancer agents isolated from secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi. Mar Drugs 2010;8:1469-81.

S Omura. Philosophy of new drug discovery. Microbiol Rev 1986;50:259-79.

JF Martin, AL Demain. Control of antibiotic synthesis. Microbiol Rev 1980;44:230-51.

Padmavathi T, Nandy V, Agarwal P. Optimization of the medium for the production of cellulases by Aspergillus terreus and Mucor plumbeus Eur J Exp Biol 2012;2:1161-70.

Betina V. Bioactive secondary metabolites of microorganisms progress in industrial microbiology, Elsevier. Amsterdam; 1994. p. 30.

Hairong Xiong, Shuhua Qi, Ying Xu, Li Miao, Pei-Yuan Qian. Antibiotic and antifouling compound production by the marine-derived fungus cladosporium sp. F14. J Hydro Environ Res 2009;2:264-70.

Yin Lu, Chuan Chen, Hong Chen, Jianfen Zhang. Isolation and identification of endophytic fungi from actinidia macrosperma and investigation of their bioactivities. J Evidence Based Complementary Altern Med 2012;8. http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1155/2012/382742

Joshi F, Chaudhari A, Joglekar P, Archana G, Desai AJ. Effect of expression of B radyrhizobium japonicum 61A152 feg a gene in mesorhizobium sp., on its competitive survival and nodule occupancy on Arachis hypogeal. Appl Soil Ecol 2008;40:338-47.

NCCLS-National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards: Performance standards for antimicrobial disc susceptibility tests. 8th edition. Approved Standard, document M2-A8[S]. NCCLS, Wayne, Pennsylvania; 2003.

Majumdar Mk, Majumdar Sk. Effects of minerals on neomycin production by streptomyces fradiae. Appl Microbiol 1965;13:190–3.

Singh LS, Mazumder S, Bora TC. Optimisation of process parameters for growth and bioactive metabolite produced by a salt-tolerant and alkaliphilic actinomycete, Streptomyces tanashiensis strain A2D. J Mycol Med 2009;19:225–33.

Ripa FA, Nikkon F, Zaman S, Khondkar P. Optimal conditions for antimicrobial metabolites production from a new streptomyces sp. RUPA-08PR isolated from Bangladeshi soil. Mycobiology 2009;37:211-4.

Naik MK, Hiremath PC, Hegde RK. Physiological and nutritional studies on Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, a causal agent of anthracnose of beetlevine, Mysore. J Agric Sci 1988;22:471-4.

Thakur D, Bora TC, Bordoloi GN, Maiumdar S. Influence of nutrition and culturing conditions for optimum growth and antimicrobial metabolite production by Streptomyces sp. 201. J Mycol Med 2009;19:161–7.

Kumara KLW, Rawal RD. Influence of carbon، nitrogen، temperature and pH on the growth and sporulation of some Indian isolates of C. gloeosporioides causing anthracnose disease of papaya (Carrica papaya L.). Tropical Agricul Res Extension 2008;11:7-12.

Miao L, Kwong TFN, Qian PY. Effect of culture conditions on mycelial growth, antibacterial activity, and metabolite profiles of the marine-derived fungus arthrinium c. f. saccharicola. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2006;72:1063-73.

Gautam SP, Bundela PS, Pandey AK, Awasthi MK, Sarsaiya S. Optimization of the medium for the production of cellulase by the Trichoderma viride using submerged fermentation. Int J Environ Sci 2010;1:4.

Saha A, Rahman MS. Antimicrobial activity of crude extract from Calycopterisfloribunsa. Bang J Microbiol 2008;25:137-9.




About this article

Title

INFLUENCE OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS ON SECONDARY METABOLITE PRODUCTION BY MARINE FUNGI

Keywords

Secondary metabolite, Anti bacterial activity, Optimization

DOI

10.22159/ijcpr.2017v9i5.22152

Date

21-09-2017

Additional Links

Manuscript Submission

Journal

International Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Research
Vol 9, Issue 5 (Aug-Sep), 2017 Page: 112-118

Online ISSN

0975-7066

Statistics

49 Views | 22 Downloads

Authors & Affiliations

Anuhya G.
Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India 522510
India

Jyostna V.
Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India 522510
India

Aswani Kumar Yvv
Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India 522510
India

Bodaiah B.
Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India 522510
India

Sudhakar P.
Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India 522510
India


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.