INSECURITY: A CAUSE AND A PRODUCT OF CONFLICT, TOWARD THE NEED FOR INDEPENDENT INDIGENOUS CSOS

Authors

  • IBRAHIM JIBRIN GANI Department of History and International Studies, Federal University, Gashua, Nigeria.
  • AISHA IBRAHIM NINGI Department of History, Yobe State University Damaturu, Nigeria.
  • ABBA BALA IBRAHIM Department of History and International Studies, Federal University, Gashua, Nigeria.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22159/ijss.2022.v10i4.44540

Keywords:

Insecurity, Conflict, Northeast, Indigenous, Civil Society Organizations.

Abstract

This paper explores the question of human security in the North-East after more than a decade long conflict with the insurgents. The paper unraveled that communities and towns do not have to flee, even though successes were made mainly as most villages and homes. It also discovered that people are still suffering from the consequences of the conflict. If the inequities that gave rise to it are left unaddressed, there is the likelihood of a relapse into conflict. Therefore, it is recommended that the government improve its work to provide security for the people. The formation of independent indigenous civil society organizations is paramount to checkmate the activities of the government. The approach employed PLS-SEM and tested two hypotheses for clear prediction and assumption as met. The Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) can become important actors in reducing violence and facilitating the conditions necessary for building sustainable peace. However, such indigenous CSOs must shift focus and strengthen their abilities to mobilize expertise and resources from their domestic constituencies and reduce the excessive dependency on foreign donors. It must also reject any international support that resembles negative external imposition.

References

Anan K. Girls Education Project: Gender Equity in Education by 2005. London: Gender Review UNESCO; 2012.

Collins S. Watching the Wind: Conflict Resolution during South Africa’s Transition to Democracy. Washington: United States Institute of Peace; 2000.

Cox M. The Paradox of Social Capital: Fuelling Conflict and Building Peace through Trust and Networks. London: Routledge; 2008.

David C. Peace: A History of Movements and Ideas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 2008.

David L. Civil Society in African contexts. Reflections on the usefulness of a concept. Dev Change 2002;33:569-86.

Edwards M. Civil Society. Cambridge: Polity Press; 2004.

John H. Unpacking the liberal peace: The dividing and merging of peacebuilding discourses. Millennium J Int Stud 2008;36:597-621.

Kaldor M. Global Civil Society: An Answer to War. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press; 2003.

Kline AD, Krantz ID, Sommer A, Kliewer M, Jackson LG, Fitz Patrick DR, et al. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Clinical review, diagnostic and scoring systems, and anticipatory guidance. Am J Med Genet A 2007;143:1287-96.

Ningi A. Seeking a different path. Int J Sci Res 2017;6:112-5.

Paffenholz T. Civil Society and Peacebuilding: A Critical Assessment. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers; 2009.

Paul J. Building Peace. Sustainable Reconciliation in Divided Societies. Washington, DC: United States Institute of Peace Press; 1997.

Peter H, Reilly B. Democracy and Deep-Rooted Conflict: Options for Negotiators. International IDEA Handbook Series. Stockholm: International IDEA; 1998.

Pouligny B. Civil society and post-conflict peacebuilding: Ambiguities of international programmes aimed at building ‘New’ societies. Secur Dialogue 2005;36:495-510.

Sen A. Development as Freedom. New York: Knopf Publishers; 1999.

Published

17-06-2022

How to Cite

GANI, I. J., NINGI, A. I., & IBRAHIM, A. B. (2022). INSECURITY: A CAUSE AND A PRODUCT OF CONFLICT, TOWARD THE NEED FOR INDEPENDENT INDIGENOUS CSOS. Innovare Journal of Social Sciences, 10(4), 6–8. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijss.2022.v10i4.44540

Issue

Section

Original Article(s)