SITTING VERSUS LATERAL POSITION FOR INDUCTION OF SPINAL ANESTHESIA IN ELDERLY PATIENTS – A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

  • Showkat Hussain Tali Health services kashmir
  • Showkat Ahmad Bhat
  • Kumar Nm
  • Shagufta Yousuf

Abstract

Objectives: To compare the effect of induction position (sitting versus lateral) for spinal anaesthesia in the elderly patient on hemodynamic, sensory block and motor block characteristics and patient satisfaction.

Material and methods: Randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing spinal anaesthesia for lower abdominal, pelvic, lower limb and urological surgeries aged more than 60 years. Hyperbaric Bupivacain (0.05%) was injected into the spinal space while the patients were either in sitting or lateral position. Effects on hemodynamic parameters, sensory block and motor block characteristics and patient satisfaction were analysed.

Results: Induction position for spinal anaesthesia does not affect the hemodynamic parameters and incidence of adverse effects when adequate preloading is done. There was no statistically significant difference in the sensory level and motor level achieved. However lateral position appears to be more comfortable for elderly patients (P= 0.03).

Conclusions: Induction position for administration of spinal anaesthesia has no effect on hemodynamic parameters or block characteristics except that patients feel more comfortable in lateral position.

Keywords: Spinal anesthesia, Induction position, Hyperbaric bupivacaine.

References

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How to Cite
Tali, S. H., S. A. Bhat, K. Nm, and S. Yousuf. “SITTING VERSUS LATERAL POSITION FOR INDUCTION OF SPINAL ANESTHESIA IN ELDERLY PATIENTS – A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 10, no. 2, Feb. 2017, pp. 262-5, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i2.15523.
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