LIFE, DEATH, AND PHARMA IN INDIA: A CASE STUDY

  • R.gayathri Saravanan Assistant Professor,School of Management,Sastra University,Thanjavur- 613401-TamilNadu,India
  • C Vijayabanu Associate Professor,School of Management,Sastra University,Thanjavur- 613401-TamilNadu,India

Abstract

“The health of the people is really the foundation on which all their happiness and all their powers as a state depend.†- Benjamin Disraeli.

A healthy society is obviously a healthy nation. Being healthy is a result of various factors such as lifestyle, income, choices, society, access to medical facilities, culture, and family. The life expectancy (LE) (i.e., average years a person is anticipated to live has almost doubled) in the past century and medical breakthroughs had a profoundly positive impact on human LE. The average LE of the people in India was 49.7 years during 1970-1975 gradually increased to the level of 68.45 years in 2016 according to the world LE reports. The objective here is to understand the factors determining LE and whether there are any possibilities for considerable improvements in LE in India due to various economic policies by the government. Statistical reports from various organizations are analyzed, and the conclusion is that the government spending on health care and awareness is to be enhanced.

Keywords: Life expectancy, Health care, Mortality, Birth rate, Death rate, etc.

 

Author Biographies

R.gayathri Saravanan, Assistant Professor,School of Management,Sastra University,Thanjavur- 613401-TamilNadu,India
Assistant Professor,School of Management,Sastra University,Thanjavur- 613401-TamilNadu,India
C Vijayabanu, Associate Professor,School of Management,Sastra University,Thanjavur- 613401-TamilNadu,India
Associate Professor,School of Management,Sastra University,Thanjavur- 613401-TamilNadu,India

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How to Cite
Saravanan, R., and C. Vijayabanu. “LIFE, DEATH, AND PHARMA IN INDIA: A CASE STUDY”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 10, no. 2, Feb. 2017, pp. 37-39, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i2.15566.
Section
Review Article(s)