ANTIOXIDATIVE AND FREE RADICAL SCAVENGING POTENTIALS OF CYCLOSORUS INTERRUPTUS (WILLD.) H. ITÔ AND PRONEPHRIUM NUDATUM (ROXB. EX GRIFF.) HOLTTUM

  • ABHIJIT MITRA Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.
  • MANABENDRA DUTTA CHOUDHURY Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.
  • PRAKASH ROY CHOUDHURY Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.
  • DEEPA NATH Department of Botany and Biotechnology, Karimganj College, Karimganj, Assam, India.
  • SUBRATA DAS Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.
  • ANUPAM DAS TALUKDAR Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.

Abstract

Objectives: The work aims to screen the antioxidative potentials of different crude extracts of the fronds of two medicinally important pteridophytes of Southern Assam, India, namely, Cyclosorus interruptus (Willd.) H. Itô and Pronephrium nudatum (Roxb. ex Griff.) Holttum.


Methods: Frond extracts of the pteridophytes were prepared by Soxhlet hot extraction method. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) of the hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol extracts of the fronds of the plants were done by following standard protocol. In vitro assessment of the antioxidative behavior of the extracts was performed using standard 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay, reducing power assay, metal chelating assay, hydroxyl, superoxide, and 2,2’- azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline - 6 – sulfonic acid) radical scavenging methods in different in vitro systems.


Results: Preliminary phytochemical analysis implicated the presence of phenolic and flavonoid compounds in all the frond extracts. The methanol extract of the fronds of both the plants showed maximum phenolic and flavonoid contents in comparison to the other extracts, however, that of C. interruptus was found to be higher than P. nudatum. Antioxidative potentials of the said extracts were also found to be impressive and noteworthy. The decreasing order of the antioxidative efficacies of the extracts was found to be same as that of TPC and TFC of the extracts.


Conclusion: It is pertinent to comment that the methanol extract of the fronds of both the plants may be treated as a potential source of natural antioxidants.

Keywords: Pteridophytes, Phytochemical, Phenolic, Flavonoid, Antioxidant

Author Biographies

ABHIJIT MITRA, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.

Ph.D scholar

Dept. of Life Science & Bioinformatics

Assam University, Silchar

MANABENDRA DUTTA CHOUDHURY, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.

Professor

Department of Life Science & Bioinformatics,

Assam University, Silchar - 788011

PRAKASH ROY CHOUDHURY, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.

Senior Research Fellow

Department of Life Science & Bioinformatics

Assam university, Silchar

DEEPA NATH, Department of Botany and Biotechnology, Karimganj College, Karimganj, Assam, India.

Assistant Professor

Department of Botany & Biotechnology

Karimganj College, Karimganj, Assam, India

SUBRATA DAS, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.

Ph.D scholar

Department of Life Science & Bioinformatics

Assam University, Silchar

ANUPAM DAS TALUKDAR, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Ethnobotany and Medicinal Plant Research Laboratory, Assam University, Silchar, Assam, India.

Assistant Professor Stage 3

Dept. of Life Science & Bioinformatics

Assam university, Silchar

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ABHIJIT MITRA, MANABENDRA DUTTA CHOUDHURY, PRAKASH ROY CHOUDHURY, DEEPA NATH, SUBRATA DAS, and ANUPAM DAS TALUKDAR. “ANTIOXIDATIVE AND FREE RADICAL SCAVENGING POTENTIALS OF CYCLOSORUS INTERRUPTUS (WILLD.) H. ITÔ AND PRONEPHRIUM NUDATUM (ROXB. EX GRIFF.) HOLTTUM”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 12, no. 9, July 2019, pp. 87-94, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ajpcr/article/view/32039.
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