VITAMIN CONTENT OF MARINE RED ALGA CHAMPIA PARVULA

  • VINOTHKUMAR R Department of Botany, Division of Algal Biotechnology and Bionano Technology, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9295-2118
  • MURUGESAN S Department of Botany, Division of Algal Biotechnology and Bionano Technology, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
  • SIVAMURUGAN V Department of Chemistry, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Abstract

Objective: The current investigation focuses on determining the vitamin content of marine red alga Champia parvula.


Methods: Vitamins were divided and analyzed using Milichrom A-02 LC and multiwavelength ultraviolet visible as a detector. A 2 mm (ID)×250 mm (l) column was used to filter comprising C18 in the inverse stage used for separation.


Results: The results suggest that the seaweed, C. parvula, contains 0.583±0.01, 3.43±0.01, 4.95±0.01, 1.95±0.01, 6.33±0.00, 174.74±0.01, and 15.75±0.01 μg of Vitamin A, B1, B5, folic acid, B12, C, and E, respectively, per gram of dry weight of the seaweed.


Conclusion: The findings indicate that the seaweed, C. parvula, has a higher nutritional value and could be used as great dietary supplements for vitamins.

Keywords: Marine algae, vitamins, Champia parvula

Author Biographies

VINOTHKUMAR R, Department of Botany, Division of Algal Biotechnology and Bionano Technology, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

PG and Research Department of Chemistry, Pachaiyappa’s College

MURUGESAN S, Department of Botany, Division of Algal Biotechnology and Bionano Technology, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Division of Algal Biotechnology and Bio-nano Technology, Post Graduate and Research Department of Botany, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai - 600030,  India

SIVAMURUGAN V, Department of Chemistry, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Division of Algal Biotechnology and Bio-nano Technology, Post Graduate and Research Department of Botany, Pachaiyappa’s College, Chennai - 600030,  India.

References

1. Marinho-Soriano E, Fonseca PC, Carneiro MA, Moreira WS. Seasonal variation in the chemical composition of two tropical seaweeds. Bioresour Technol 2006;97:2402-6.
2. Indergaard M, Minsaas J. Animal and human nutrition. In: Guiry MD, Blunder G, editors. Seaweed Resources in Europe: Uses and Potential. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons; 1991. p. 22-64.
3. Ventura MR, Castanon JI. The nutritive value of seaweed (Ulva lactuca) forgoats. Small Rumin Res 1998;29:325-7.
4. McHugh DJ. A guide to Seaweeds Industry, FAO Fisheries Technical Paper, No. 441. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization; 2003. p. 105.
5. Mabeau S, Fleurence J. Seaweed in food products: Biochemical and nutritional aspects. Trends Food Sci Technol 1993;4:103-7.
6. Abdel-Fatta AF, Edrees M. Composition of some brown algae as influenced by seasonal variation. Phytochemistry 1973;9:721-4.
7. Abdel-Fattah AF, Hussein MM, Fouad ST. Carbohydrates of the brown seaweed Dictyota dichotoma. Phytochemistry 1978;17:741-3.
8. Hussein MM, Abdel-Aziz A, Salem HM. Composition of Enteromorpha intestinalis as influenced by seasonal variation. Egypt J Bot 1981;24:131-5.
9. Kim SK, Taylor S, editor. Marine medicinal foods: Implications and applications, macro and microalgae. In: Food and Nutrition Research. San Diego, CA: Academic Press; 2011. p. 358-63.
10. Sanchez-Machado DI, LopeZ-Cervantes J, Lopez-hernandez J, Pseiro- Losada P. Fatty acids, total lipid, protein and ash contents of processed edible seaweeds. Food Chemist 2004;85:439-44.
11. Desikachary TV, Krishnamurthy V, Balakrishnan MS. Rhodophyta. Vol. 2. Chennai: Madras Science Foundation; 1998. p. 359.
12. Kozhanova LA, Fedorova GA, Baram GI. Determination of water and fat-soluble vitamins in multivitamin preparations by high-performance liquid chromatography. J Anal Chem 2002;57:40-5.
13. Norziah MH, Ching CY. Nutritional composition of edible seaweed Gracilaria changgi. Food Chem 2000;68:69-76.
14. Fattal-Valevski A, Kesler A, Sela BA, Nitzan-Kaluski D, Rotstein M, Mesterman R, et al. Outbreak of life-threatening thiamine deficiency in infants in Israel caused by a defective soy-based formula. Pediatrics 2005;115:e233-8.
15. Swarnalatha G. Comparison of nutritive value of seaweed with other terrestrial foods a review. Int J Food Nutr Sci 2018;7:61-70.
16. Mahan LK, Escott-Stump S. Krause’s Food, Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 10th ed. London: W.B.Saunders Company; 2000.
17. Ravishankar GA, Sarada R, Kamath BS, Namitha KK. Food applications of algae. In: Pometto A, Shetty K, Paliyath G, Levin RE, editors. Food Biotechnology. 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 2005. p. 493-6.
18. Gajalakshmi D, Shettu N, Murugesan S. Vitamin content of marine red alga Botryocladia leptopoda (J. Agardh) kylin potential use as a source of vitamins in nutrition. J Life Sci 2018;6:263-8.
19. Kumar BS, Murugesan S. Evaluation of fatty acid, mineral and vitamin compositions of Laurencia papillosa from the south east coast of India. Indo Am J Pharm Sci 2018;5:2681-7.
20. Sethi P. Biochemical composition of marine brown algae, Padina tetrastromatica Hauck. Int J Curr Pharm Res 2012;4:117-8.
21. Kumar RV, Murugesan S, Bhuvaneswari S. Phytochemical analysis of red alga Champia parvula (C. Agardh) collected from mandapam coast of Tamil Nadu, India. Int J Adv Pharm 2015;4:16-20.
22. National Academy of Sciences. Institute of medicine. Food and nutrition board. In: Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin and Choline. Ch. 8. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1998.
23. Dietary reference values for food energy and nutrients for the United Kingdom. Report of the panel on dietary reference values of the committee on medical aspects of food policy. Rep Health Soc Subj (Lond) 1991;41:1-210.
24. Institut de Phytonutrition. Functional, Health and Therapeutic Effects of Algae and Seaweed. Institut de Phytonutrition Electronic Database. Version 1.5. Beausoleil, France: Institut de Phytonutrition; 2004.
25. Croft MT, Lawrence AD, Raux-Deery E, Warren MJ, Smith AG. Algae acquire Vitamin B12 through a symbiotic relationship with bacteria. Nature 2005;438:90-3.
26. Takenaka S, Sugiyama S, Ebara S, Miyamoto E, Abe K, Tamura Y, et al. Feeding dried purple laver (nori) to Vitamin B12-deficient rats significantly improves Vitamin B12 status. Br J Nutr 2001;85:699-703.
27. Rebouche CJ. Ascorbic acid and carnitine biosynthesis. Am J Clin Nutr 1991;54:1147S-1152S.
28. Qasim R, Barakati S. Ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid contents of marine algal species from Karachi. Pak J Sci Ind Res 1985;28:129-33.
29. Zarogoulidis P, Kioumis I, Ritzoulis C, Petridis D, Darwiche K, Porpodis K, et al. New insights in the production of aerosol antibiotics. Evaluation of the optimal aerosol production system for ampicillin-sulbactam, meropenem, ceftazidime, cefepime and piperacillin-tazobactam. Int J Pharm 2013;455:182-8.
30. Durmaz Y, Duyar H, Gokpinar S, Taskaya L, Ogretmen Y, Bandarra N, et al. Fatty acids, ?-tocopherol and total pigment contents of Cystoseira spp., Ulva spp. and Zostera spp. from Sinop Bay (Turkey). Int J Nat Eng Sci 2008;2:111-4.
31. Panayotova V, Stancheva M. Mineral composition of marine macroalgae from the Bulgarian black sea coast. Scr Sci Med 2013;45:42-5.
Statistics
110 Views | 16 Downloads
How to Cite
VINOTHKUMAR R, MURUGESAN S, and SIVAMURUGAN V. “VITAMIN CONTENT OF MARINE RED ALGA CHAMPIA PARVULA”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 12, no. 10, Aug. 2019, pp. 207-9, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ajpcr/article/view/35134.
Section
Original Article(s)