SCREENING OF PHYTOCHEMICAL CONTENT AND IN VITRO BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF CANTHIUM DICOCCUM (GAERTN.) AND AMISCHOPHACELUS AXILLARIS (L.)

  • MEGHASHREE K S Department Chemistry, Sahyadri Science College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.
  • LATHA K P Department Chemistry, Sahyadri Science College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.
  • VAGDEVI H M Department Chemistry, Sahyadri Science College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.
  • AJISH A D Department Chemistry, Sahyadri Science College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.
  • JAYANNA N D Department Chemistry, Sahyadri Science College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.
  • ARUNKUMAR N C Department Chemistry, Sahyadri Science College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to study the pet ether, ethyl acetate, and ethanol leaf extracts of Canthium dicoccum and Amischophacelus axillaris for anthelmintic activity and antihypertensive activity.


Methods: The antihypertensive activity was carried out by employing a colorimetric assay based on the hydrolysis of Histidyl-Hippuryl-Leucine and anthelmintic activity carried out against Indian earthworm Pheritimaposthuma.


Results: The pet ether leaf extract both the plants exhibited the maximum antihypertensive activity with a percent inhibition of 64.82 for C. dicoccum (Gaertn.) and 84.12 for A. axillaris (L.) as compared with Captopril showing percent inhibition 85.37 and for anthelmintic activity, it is found that ethanol extract of C. dicoccum and ethyl acetate extract of A. axillaris exhibited significant activity against the standard drug albendazole.


Conclusion: This study investigated the potential of C. dicoccum and A. axillaris as a new source against the antihypertensive activity. The outcome of anthelmintic activity revealed that the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts exhibited a considerable amount of anthelmintic activity, which is mainly due to the active phytoconstituents present in the extracts.

Keywords: Antihypertensive, Anthelmintic, Canthium dicoccum (Gaertn.), Amischophacelus axillaris (L.), Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme inhibitors

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MEGHASHREE K S, LATHA K P, VAGDEVI H M, AJISH A D, JAYANNA N D, and ARUNKUMAR N C. “SCREENING OF PHYTOCHEMICAL CONTENT AND IN VITRO BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF CANTHIUM DICOCCUM (GAERTN.) AND AMISCHOPHACELUS AXILLARIS (L.)”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 13, no. 1, Nov. 2019, pp. 109-14, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2020.v13i1.36200.
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