The effectiveness of a health promotion program using the International Organization for Standardization in Klongyong and Nikhompattana, Thailand

  • SUCHINDA MARUO JARUPAT Shinshu university
  • Noppawan Piasue Ramathibodi School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
  • Surintorn Kalampakorn Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University
  • Pinyo Utthiya Ramathibodi School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
  • Siriporn Sasimonthonkul Faculty of Sports Science Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen Campus
  • Hisaaki Tabuchi Department of Psychology, University of Innsbruck
  • Hisaki Akasaki Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Shinshu University
  • Toshiaki Watanabe Faculty of Education, Shinshu University
  • Naoya Taki Faculty of Education, Shinshu University
  • RYOJI UCHIYAMA National Institute of Technology, Nagano College
  • Kazuki Ashida National Institute of Technology, Nagano College
  • Masao Okuhara Suwa University of Science, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Information Engineering
  • KOJI TERASAWA

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to appropriately establish a healthcare program in Thailand that acquired ISO 9001 certification; QC14J0022 (the International Organization for Standardization, ISO) improved problems and inspected the program’s effectiveness. Furthermore, we are making this ISO health promotion widely available in Asian countries and are making an international contribution.
Method: We implemented a 9-month health program in Klongyong and a 6-month health program in Nikhompattana, Rayong, Thailand. This program assessed findings from pedometry, anthropometry, physical fitness, and brain function tests.
Results: In Klongyong, the average number of walking and exercise steps was 3471.3, and in Nikhompattana, the average number of walking and exercise steps was 4695.5. The pre- and post-health program results in Klongyong showed significant differences in blood pressure, hand grip strength, the 10-meter obstacle walk and the 6-minute walk. In Nikhompattana, there were significant differences in hand grip strength and sit-and-reach flexibility as well as the brain function tests. The pre- and post-health program results in Klongyong and Nikhompattana showed significant differences in the total number of “forgets”.
Conclusions: The findings from before and after the health program in Nikhompattana suggest that the increased physical activity during the course of the program may have led to improved brain function results.

Keywords: health promotion, pedometer, physical fitness, brain function

Author Biographies

Noppawan Piasue, Ramathibodi School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University

Associate Professor

Surintorn Kalampakorn, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University

Associate Professor

Pinyo Utthiya, Ramathibodi School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University

Doctoral student

Siriporn Sasimonthonkul, Faculty of Sports Science Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen Campus

Associate Professor

Hisaaki Tabuchi, Department of Psychology, University of Innsbruck

Assistant

Hisaki Akasaki, Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Shinshu University

Asistant

Toshiaki Watanabe, Faculty of Education, Shinshu University

Associate Professor

Naoya Taki, Faculty of Education, Shinshu University

Lecturer

RYOJI UCHIYAMA, National Institute of Technology, Nagano College

Professor

Kazuki Ashida, National Institute of Technology, Nagano College

Associate Professor

Masao Okuhara, Suwa University of Science, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Applied Information Engineering

Professor

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JARUPAT, S. M., N. Piasue, S. Kalampakorn, P. Utthiya, S. Sasimonthonkul, H. Tabuchi, H. Akasaki, T. Watanabe, N. Taki, R. UCHIYAMA, K. Ashida, M. Okuhara, and K. TERASAWA. “The Effectiveness of a Health Promotion Program Using the International Organization for Standardization in Klongyong and Nikhompattana, Thailand”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 13, no. 3, Feb. 2020, pp. 187-92, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2020.v13i3.36506.
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