ADVERSE DRUG REACTION MONITORING AMONG HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS OF TERTIARY CARE CENTER OF NORTH INDIA RELATED TO ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS

  • SEEMA MISHRA Department of Pharmacology, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • SYED S AHMAD Department of Pharmacology, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • NILAM NIGAM Department of Pharmacology, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • PRATAP SHANKAR Center For Advance Research, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • SHRAVAN KUMAR Department of Medicine, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • VINAY KUMAR Department of Pharmacology, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • SHALINI GUPTA Department of Pharmacology, Rama Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to monitor the adverse drug reactions (A.D.Rs.) associated with antihypertensive drugs.


Methods: All patients coming to the department with blood pressure systolic above 120 mmHg and diastolic above 90 mmHg and prescribed hypertensives will be screened for the study.


Results and Discussion: A total of 136 patients were observed during the study. Out of 136 patients, 23 (17%) A.D.Rs. were recorded. A study conducted by Ramesh et al. in the Indian capital reports that 22.3% of the patients experienced A.D.Rs.


Conclusion: Furthermore, any appearance of A.D.Rs. due to side effects of the drugs or due to bad control and patients non-compliance, it was treated mainly by decreasing the doses of the drugs, switching them to another active substance from the same pharmacological group, or by adding more active substances from different pharmacological groups in lower dosages to achieve the B.P goals.

Keywords: Adverse drug reaction, Monitoring, Hypertensive patients, Tertiary care center, India, Antihypertensive drugs

References

1. Rawson NSB, Pearce GL, Inman WH. Prescription-event monitoring: Methodology and recent progress. J Clin Epidemiol 1990;43:509-22.
2. Anchala R, Kannuri NK, Pant H, Khan H, Franco OH, di Angelantonio E, et al. Hypertension in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension. J Hypertens 2014;32:1170-7.
3. World Health Organization. Hypertension-Fact Sheet. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2018. Available from: http://www.searo.who. int/entity/noncommunicable_diseases/media/non_communicable_ diseases_hypertension_fs.pdf?ua=1.
4. Lim SS, Vos T, Flaxman AD, Danaei G, Shibuya K, Adair-Rohani H, et al. A comparative risk assessment of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990-2010: A systematic analysis for the global burden of disease study 2010. Lancet 2012;380:2224-60.
5. Harikrishnan S, Leeder S, Huffman M, Jeemon P, Prabhakaran D. A Race against Time: The Challenge of Cardiovascular Diseases in Developing Economies. New Delhi, India: Centre for Chronic Disease Control; 2014.
6. Reddy KS, Shah B, Varghese C, Ramadoss A. Responding to the threat of chronic diseases in India. Lancet 2005;366:1744-9.
7. Gupta R. Trends in hypertension epidemiology in India. J Hum Hypertens 2004;18:73-8.
8. World Health Organization. The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke/ Judith Mackay and George Mensah; with Shanthi Mendis and Kurt Greenland. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2004. Available from: http://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/43007.
9. Lopez AD, Mathers CD, Ezzati M, Jamison DT, Murray CJ. Global and regional burden of disease and risk factors, 2001: Systematic analysis of population health data. Lancet 2006;367:1747-57.
10. Kearney PM, Whelton M, Reynolds K, Muntner P, Whelton PK, He J. Global burden of hypertension: Analysis of worldwide data. Lancet 2005;365:217-23.
11. Naranjo CA. A method for estimating the probability of adverse drug reactions. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1981;30:239-45.
12. ALLHAT Officers and Coordinators for the ALLHAT Collaborative Research Group, The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial. Major outcomes in high-risk hypertensive patients randomized to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or calcium channel blocker vs diuretic: The antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment to prevent heart attack trial (ALLHAT). JAMA 2002;288:2981-97.
13. Mathers CD, Loncar D. Projections of global mortality and burden of disease from 2002 to 2030. PLoS Med 2006;3:e442.
14. Ramesh M, Pandit J, Parthasarathi G. Adverse drug reactions in a south Indian hospital-their severity and cost involved. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2003;12:687-92.
15. Garg KC, Singhal KC. Adverse reactions to propranolol, a non-selective beta-adrenergic blocking agent in hypertensive patients-a collaborative study. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 1993;37:67-70.
16. Khurshid F. Monitoring of adverse drug reactions associated with antihypertensive medicines at a university teaching hospital in New Delhi. Daru 2012;20:34.
Statistics
31 Views | 48 Downloads
Citations
How to Cite
MISHRA, S., S. S. AHMAD, N. NIGAM, P. SHANKAR, S. KUMAR, V. KUMAR, and S. GUPTA. “ADVERSE DRUG REACTION MONITORING AMONG HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS OF TERTIARY CARE CENTER OF NORTH INDIA RELATED TO ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 14, no. 3, Mar. 2021, pp. 157-60, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2021.v14i3.40496.
Section
Original Article(s)