CLINICAL PROFILE, PRESCRIPTION PATTERNS, AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH VITILIGO: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

  • INDRANEEL M Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sree Vidyanikethan College of Pharmacy, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • GOVARDHAN M Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sree Vidyanikethan College of Pharmacy, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • KIRANMAYI T Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sree Vidyanikethan College of Pharmacy, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • SNEHA REDDY PR Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sree Vidyanikethan College of Pharmacy, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • SUREKHA A Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, SVIMS/SPMC-W, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • DIVYA REKHA O Department of Pharmacy Practice, Sree Vidyanikethan College of Pharmacy, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • RAM SHARAN T Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy, SVIMS/SPMC-W, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • ANNA BALAJI Principal, Sree Vidyanikethan College of Pharmacy, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of the study were to assess clinical profile (age of onset, age of presentation, gender, site of involvement, severity (stage), type of vitiligo, triggering factors, and associated diseases), prescription patterns (monotherapy, combination therapy, oral, topical, and therapeutic categories of drugs prescribed) and to monitor and report adverse drug reactions (based on World Health Organization [WHO] causality assessment scale) in vitiligo patients.


Methods: A hospital-based prospective observational study was carried out by evaluating and assessing the clinical profile and prescription patterns of 85 patients who attended dermatology venereology and leprosy (DVL) outpatient department at Sri Padmavathi Medical College for Women, SVIMS, Tirupati, over a period of 6 months from June 2019 to December 2019.


Results: In our study, forty four (51.77%) patients were female, vitiligo vulgaris is the most common morphological type observed in twenty seven (31.76%) patients. 31–50 years was the predominant age group. The mean age of onset and presentation was 38.35 (standard deviation of 18.37) and 43.27 (standard deviation of 17.96) years, respectively. Forty-one (48.23%) patients were having Stage 1 vitiligo. Fifty (58.85%) patients were having vitiligo at more than 1 site. Twelve (14.11%) patients were having a positive family history of vitiligo. Thirty-seven (43.53%) patients had triggering factors. Associated diseases were found in thirty (35%) patients. Combination therapy was given to sixty one (71.77%) patients. Topical medications were given to fifty two (61.18%) patients. During the study, we did not have a single patient complaining of any adverse drug reaction.


Conclusion: Longer the time after appearance of vitiligo, lesser the number of patients attending follow-up. If vitiligo is diagnosed at the earliest stage, more are the chances for complete repigmentation. Patients with a poor economic background are less bothered about their skin condition and are not using medications properly.

Keywords: Clinical profiles, Prescription patterns, Vitiligo

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M, I., G. M, K. T, S. R. PR, S. A, D. REKHA O, R. SHARAN T, and A. BALAJI. “CLINICAL PROFILE, PRESCRIPTION PATTERNS, AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH VITILIGO: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 14, no. 4, Apr. 2021, pp. 51-55, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2021.v14i4.40658.
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