EVALUATION OF QOS (QUALITY OF SERVICES) BY LOG FRAME ANALYSIS (LFA) AND OCULAR MORBIDITY IN SCHOOL CHILDREN OF CHANDIGARH

  • Sonia Puri Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203
  • Ramandeep Singh Dang Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203
  • Akshay . Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203
  • Amarjeet Singh Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203
  • Sunandan Sood Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203
  • Vishal . Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203
  • N K Goel Associate Professor Department of Neurosurgery, GGS Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India, 151203

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the school vision health program being run by the Chandigarh administration for students, under National Program for Control of Blindness.

- To assess the visual acuity disorders in them.

Methods: The population based cross sectional study was done in fourteen schools of Chandigarh. Chandigarh was divided in four quarters. Sampling frame comprised of Government schools. The eye component of a school health program so run in government schools, by Chandigarh administration was evaluated by LFA. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS13 and Epi Info 2000.

Results: A total of 5404 children were studied, out of which 2801(51.83%) were boys and 2603(48.16%) were girls. Girls in our study showed a higher prevalence of defective visual acuity among girls 322(5.95%). Female preponderance was observed in all age groups.

Evaluation of school health program showed that 51(36%) subjects were of the opinion that all students were examined, 25 (17.86%) told that more than 20% of students were referred to GMCH-32 for further management. All the interviewers agreed that manpower in school health team was adequate.

Conclusion: Low compliance with ocular morbidity was evident as less number of students contacted the eye health physician even after being referred. There is a need to spread awareness pertaining to eye health that can be using local media or by health care workers. More over emphasis has not only to be on therapeutic aspect but prevention too has to be given importance.


 

Keywords: Log frame analysis, Ocular morbidity.

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How to Cite
Puri, S., R. S. Dang, A. ., A. Singh, S. Sood, V. ., and N. K. Goel. “EVALUATION OF QOS (QUALITY OF SERVICES) BY LOG FRAME ANALYSIS (LFA) AND OCULAR MORBIDITY IN SCHOOL CHILDREN OF CHANDIGARH”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 6, no. 9, 1, pp. 55-58, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/3199.
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