AN OVERVIEW OF VARIOUS SCALES USED IN CAUSALITY ASSESSMENT OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS

  • ADUSUMILLI PRAMOD KUMAR Department of Pharmacy Practice, Chebrolu Hanumaiah Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhrapradesh
  • DHARINI BHOOPATHI Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center, SDS Tuburculosis Research Centre and Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases, Bengaluru, Karnataka,
  • HARIPRIYA SUNKARA Department of Pharmacy Practice, Chebrolu Hanumaiah Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhrapradesh
  • SRI HARSHA CHALASANI Faculty of Pharmacy, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysuru, Karnataka

Abstract

Establishing a relationship of causality between the medications received and the events occurred utilizing causality assessment scale is much needed to reduce the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and to prevent exposure of patients towards additional drug hazards. Causality assessment can be defined as the determination of chance, whether a selected intervention is the root cause of the adverse event observed. The causality assessment is the responsibility of either a single expert or an established committee. As it is a common phenomenon of variable perception of knowledge and experience by each expert, there is a high possibility of disagreement and inter-individual variability on assessment. Many of the causality assessment methods have their advantages and disadvantages. However, no single scale has been adopted as standardized and considered for uniform acceptance.

Keywords: Pharmacovigilance, Causality assessment scales, Adverse drug reactions

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KUMAR, A. P., D. BHOOPATHI, H. SUNKARA, and S. H. CHALASANI. “AN OVERVIEW OF VARIOUS SCALES USED IN CAUSALITY ASSESSMENT OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 12, no. 5, Mar. 2020, pp. 1-5, doi:10.22159/ijpps.2020v12i5.37209.
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