CLINICAL PROFILE OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS WITH GYNAECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS IN RURAL SOUTH INDIA

  • NULAKATHATI VANI Department of Pharmacy Practice, Raghavendra Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (RIPER) Autonomous, Ananthapuramu, Andhra Pradesh, India 515721
  • NISHADHAM SRAVANI Department of Pharmacy Practice, Raghavendra Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (RIPER) Autonomous, Ananthapuramu, Andhra Pradesh, India 515721
  • THIPPESWAMY RAMYA Department of Pharmacy Practice, Raghavendra Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (RIPER) Autonomous, Ananthapuramu, Andhra Pradesh, India 515721
  • MOHANRAJ RATHINAVELU Department of Pharmacy Practice, Raghavendra Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (RIPER) Autonomous, Ananthapuramu, Andhra Pradesh, India 515721
  • MEKALA JYOTHI SUCHITRA Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Rural Development Trust (RDT) Hospital, Bathalapalli, Ananthapuramu, Andhra Pradesh, India 515661

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the six months observational study is to evaluate the gynaecological problems of the adolescent girls, attending the gynaecological outpatient department of a secondary care referral healthcare facility in rural south India.


Methods: After ethical clearance, adolescent girls in the age group of 10-19 y having gynaecological problems, who had experienced at least 3 consecutive menstrual cycles, and who showed willingness towards study were included; and adolescent girls in 10-19 y age group having a pregnancy and its complications were excluded.


Results: Out of 161 adolescent girls, 46.01% belong to late adolescence with more distribution of gynaecological problems. The gynaecological problems majorly observed were menstrual disorder 59.63%, abdominal pain (11.18%), white discharge per vagina (9.94%), and 8.07% of heavy menstrual bleeding. The menstrual disorder complained with amenorrhea 40.63%, polymenorrhea 18.75%, and menorrhagia 16.67%. In our study, 26.09% and 32.3% of adolescent girls were anaemic and underweight, respectively.


Conclusion: In conclusion, our study showcased evidently that young adolescent girls are at higher risk of both gynaecological problems and menses disorders in the rural setting; for whom more amount of awareness to be parented and education of menstrual hygiene and hemodynamic effects has to be culminated through health education, for a future healthier nation.

Keywords: Adolescence gynaecology, Amenorrhea, Anaemia, Rural care

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VANI, N., N. SRAVANI, T. RAMYA, M. RATHINAVELU, and M. J. SUCHITRA. “CLINICAL PROFILE OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS WITH GYNAECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS IN RURAL SOUTH INDIA”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 12, no. 9, July 2020, pp. 9-12, doi:10.22159/ijpps.2020v12i9.38724.
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