THE PREDICTORS OF POTENTIAL DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS AMONG DIABETIC HYPERTENSIVE ADULT OUTPATIENTS IN A KENYAN REFERRAL HOSPITAL

  • SIMON MAKITE UNIVERSITY OF NAIROBI
  • DAVID NYAMU University of Nairobi
  • ROSALINE KINUTHIA Kenyatta National Hospital

Abstract

ABSTRACT
Objective: To characterize the predictors of potential drug-drug interactions among adult diabetic
hypertensive outpatients at Kenyatta National Hospital.
Methods: This cross-sectional study collected and analyzed data from 104 diabetic hypertensive
outpatients (aged ≥18 years) at the Department of Endocrinology Outpatient Clinic of Kenyatta
National Hospital from 1st May 2019 to 31st August 2019. The main outcome measure was the
prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions and their predictors among adult diabetic
hypertensives.
Results: There was female preponderance (70.2%). The mean age of the study participants was
61.6 years (SD±10.8). The prevalence of potential drug interactions was high at 57.7%. The
average number of drug interactions was one interacting pair per patient, with majority of the
prescriptions (81.0%) having moderate drug-drug interactions. Drug-drug interactions were
significantly associated the advanced stage of hypertension (p=0.031), concomitant use of ≥2
drugs (p= 0.048), use of nifedipine (p=0.002), carvedilol (p=0.001) and losartan (p=0.014).
Conclusion: Patients with both diabetes and advanced hypertension have a high potential for drug
interactions due to polypharmacy and the class of drug prescribed. Clinicians should be aware that
the level of blood pressure control and use of common antihypertensives may compound the drug
interactions. Future studies should characterize the specific type of drug interactions, clinical
outcomes and possible targets of minimization of drug-drug interactions.

Keywords: Key Words: Potential drug-drug interactions, Diabetes, Hypertension, antihypertensives

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MAKITE, S., D. NYAMU, and R. KINUTHIA. “THE PREDICTORS OF POTENTIAL DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS AMONG DIABETIC HYPERTENSIVE ADULT OUTPATIENTS IN A KENYAN REFERRAL HOSPITAL”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 12, no. 12, Nov. 2020, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/38810.
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