A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF FLUOROQUINOLONES IN EXPERIMENTAL SEIZURES ON WISTAR RATS: AN ACUTE STUDY

  • Aiswarya Aravind Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
  • Gopalakrishna H N Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
  • Ramya Kateel Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
  • Mohandas Rai Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
  • Deepthi Shridhar Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
  • Reefa Alina D'souza Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004

Abstract

Objective: To compare the convulsive profile of three different Fluoroquinolones namely Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin and Ofloxacin using Maximal Electro Shock (MES) as an experimental seizure model.

Methods: Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups with 6 animals each. Group I was administered Gum acacia 1 % solution (control), Group II with Standard drug, Sodium Valproate and Group III-VII received 25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg of Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin and Ofloxacin each respectively. After 45 min of administration of drugs, animals were subjected to MES.

Results: Ciprofloxacin prolonged various phases of MES, Ciprofloxacin 50 mg/kg group increased Tonic Hindlimb Extensor (THE) duration by 91% compared to the control group which was statistically significant. Levofloxacin group exhibited pro convulsive activity which was not significant. Ofloxacin 50 mg/kg group exhibited 80% reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extensor phase and early recovery phase compared to control group (4.2±1.09 s and 169.33±5.3 s) respectively, proven statistically significant. Ofloxacin group exhibited anticonvulsant like activity.

Conclusion: Fluoroquinolones are the popular class of antimicrobials used in a variety of infections. However, conflicting experimental evidence regarding central neurotoxicity especially seizures, complicate their use and required further investigation. Our results suggest that older generation Fluoroquinolones like Ciprofloxacin exhibits significant dose-dependent pro convulsive activity. Hence, their use must be judiciously restricted in patients with predisposing epileptogenic factors. Levofloxacin had no significant pro convulsant activity. Ofloxacin on higher dose appears to be protective exhibiting an anticonvulsant like activity. Hence, if need be, newer generation Fluoroquinolones should be preferred.

 

Keywords: Fluoroquinolones, Ciprofloxacin, Levofloxacin, Ofloxacin, MES, Anticonvulsant

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Author Biographies

Aiswarya Aravind, Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
Post Graduate
Gopalakrishna H N, Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004

Professor

 

Ramya Kateel, Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
Lecturer
Mohandas Rai, Department of Pharmacology, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Mangalore, India 575004
Professor & Head

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How to Cite
Aravind, A., G. H. N, R. Kateel, M. Rai, D. Shridhar, and R. A. D’souza. “A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF FLUOROQUINOLONES IN EXPERIMENTAL SEIZURES ON WISTAR RATS: AN ACUTE STUDY”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 8, no. 8, June 2015, pp. 305-8, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/6918.
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