GC MS AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF CINNAMOMUM TAMALA

  • Kalubai Vari Khajapeer Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry, India 605014
  • Pracha Phani Krishna Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry, India 605014
  • Rajasekaran Baskaran Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry, India 605014

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the phytoconstituents and elements present in hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM) and methanol (MET) extracts of Cinnamomum tamala (CT).

Methods: Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was carried out to determine the principal constituents present in HEX, DCM and MET extracts of CT. Elemental analysis of CT was carried out by X–Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometer analysis.

Results: GC-MS analysis showed the presence of various compounds in HEX, DCM and MET extracts of CT. Eugenol was found to be the major compound in HEX and DCM extracts of CT. 2 compounds namely 2,6,10-trimethyl-12-oxatricyclo[7.3.0.0{1,6}]tridec-2-ene, Hexahydropyridine,4-[4,5-dimethoxyphenyl]-in HEX extract and 3 compounds in DCM extract namely 6á,19-CycloAndrost-4-ene-3,17-dione, 2,5-chloro-3β-hydroxy-6β-nitro-5α-androstan-17-one, Aceticacid,10,13-dimethyl-2-oxo-2,3,4,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17-tetradecahydro-1H cyclopenta [a]phenanthren-17-ylester are newly reported. XRF analysis revealed the presence of various elements in CT. Out of these; calcium and potassium were found to be major elements, whereas titanium was found to be a minor element.

Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrate the presence of 31 various important phytoconstituents in HEX, DCM and MET extracts of CT and presence of 13 elements in CT.

 

Keywords: Phytoconstituents, Extracts, Compounds, Elements

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Author Biography

Rajasekaran Baskaran, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry, India 605014
Associate Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Puducherry, India – 605014.

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How to Cite
Khajapeer, K. V., P. P. Krishna, and R. Baskaran. “GC MS AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF CINNAMOMUM TAMALA”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 8, no. 8, June 2015, pp. 398-02, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/6971.
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