ESTIMATION OF ALKALOIDS AND PHENOLICS OF FIVE EDIBLE CUCURBITACEOUS PLANTS AND THEIR ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY

  • Bikash Debnath Department of Pharmacy, State Biotech Hub, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University (A central Universit) Suryamaninagar, West Tripura 799022
  • Md. Jashim Uddin Department of Human Physiology Tripura University (A central Universit) Suryamaninagar, West Tripura 799022
  • Prasenjit Patari State Biotech Hub, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University (A central Universit) Suryamaninagar, West Tripura 799022
  • Manik Das Department of Pharmacy, Tripura University (A central Universit) Suryamaninagar, West Tripura 799022
  • Debasish Maiti Department of Human Physiology, State Biotech Hub, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University (A central Universit) Suryamaninagar, West Tripura 799022
  • Kuntal Manna Department of Pharmacy, Tripura University (A central Universit) Suryamaninagar, West Tripura 799022

Abstract

Objective: Objective of the present work was qualitative and quantitative estimation of alkaloids and phenolics of five edible cucurbitaceous plants and to evaluate their antibacterial activity against some human pathogenic bacteria.

Methods: Total alkaloid present was determined by acid-based titrimetric methods using methyl red as an indicator and observing a faint yellow end point. Total phenolics were estimated by follin-ciocaltue’s method using tannic acid as standard. Antibacterial activity was determined by Disc diffusion method using SRL Agar medium. The 70% ethanolic dried powdered was dissolved in 20% DMSO at different concentration to carry out the anti-microbial activity.

Results: It was found that all the experimental plants contained almost equal amount of alkaloids but their phenolic contents as tannic acid equivalents were different. Alkaloids content of five Cucurbitaceous plants were found to vary from 1.15 g % to 1.34 g % and phenol content was varied from 4.54 mg/g to 10.13 mg/g. All the selected Cucurbitaceous plants were active against the tested pathogens, except against V. cholerae non.0139 (L4). Only the 70% ethanolic leaf extract of Momordica charantia (Linn.) showed a relative percentage inhibition from 15.02 to 16.63. So, Momordica charantia (Linn.) extract was the most active among five selected plants against the tested pathogens.

Conclusion: The activity might be due to the presence of alkaloids and phenols. However, the extent of activity or zone of inhibition was found varied for different extracts might be due to the difference in the constituents present in the plant extracts.

Keywords: Cucurbitaceous, Alkaloids, Phenolics, Antibacterial activity, Human pathogen

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How to Cite
Debnath, B., M. J. Uddin, P. Patari, M. Das, D. Maiti, and K. Manna. “ESTIMATION OF ALKALOIDS AND PHENOLICS OF FIVE EDIBLE CUCURBITACEOUS PLANTS AND THEIR ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 7, no. 12, Oct. 2015, pp. 223-7, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/8992.
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