PHARMACOKINETICS AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF TYLVALOSIN AFTER ORAL, INTRAMUSCULAR AND INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION IN TURKEYS

  • Abeer M. Radi Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Egypt

Abstract

Objective: Tylvalosin, is a new macrolide antibiotic, it is highly effective against a range of important diseases in many different veterinary species specially pigs and poultry. The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of Tylvalosin were investigated in healthy turkeys.

Methods: Tylvalosin was orally, intramuscularly, and intravenously administrated to turkeys in a single dose of (25 mg/kg b.w.), and the blood samples were analyzed by using a microbiological assay method.

Results: After intravenous injection, the serum concentration-time curves were best described by a two compartment-open model. The distribution and elimination half–life t 0.5 α and t 0.5 β were (0.076±0.0014 h, 0.788±0.107 h), respectively. The volume of distribution Vdss was (1.155±0.183 L/kg), with body clearance Cl (B) of (1.489±0.143 ml/kg/h). Following oral administration, Tylvalosin was absorbed with t 0.5 ab (0.283±0.012 h) and eliminated, with t 0.5 el (5.309±0.542 h). The peak serum concentration was (0.637±0.018 µg/ml) at Tmax of (1.293±0.024 h). Following intramuscular administration, Tylvalosin was absorbed with t 0.5 ab (0.076±0.003 h) and eliminated with t 0.5 el (0.467±0.058 h). The peak serum concentration was (1.446±0.121 µg/ml) at Tmax of (0.282±0.008 h). The systemic bioavailability of Tylvalosin following oral administration was 33.84% and 14.06% after intramuscular administration.

Conclusion: These results indicate that, after oral and intramuscular administration, Tylvalosin was rapidly absorbed and distributed to tissues of turkeys. However, repeated doses are necessary to maintain Tylvalosin serum concentration above the MIC for most susceptible microorganisms.

 

Keywords: Tylvalosin, Pharmacokinetics, Bioavailability, Oral, Intramuscular, Intravenous, Turkeys

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Radi, A. M. “PHARMACOKINETICS AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF TYLVALOSIN AFTER ORAL, INTRAMUSCULAR AND INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION IN TURKEYS”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 8, no. 2, Feb. 2016, pp. 140-4, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/9578.
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