STUDY THE EFFECT OF MYCOPLASMA CONTAMINATION OF EGGS USED IN VIRUS TITRATION AND EFFICACY OF SOME LIVE ATTENUATED POULTRY VIRAL VACCINES

  • Marwa Fathy 1Department of Bacterial Sterility, Central Laboratory for Evaluation of Veterinary Biologics (CLEVB), Abbasia, Cairo, Egypt
  • Mounir M Elsafty Quality Control of SPF Eggs Department, Central Laboratory for Evaluation of Veterinary Biologics (CLEVB), Abassia, Cairo, Egyp
  • Jakeen K Eljakee Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt
  • Howaida I Abdalla Department of Chemistry of Natural Compounds, National Research Centre, 12622 Dokki, Cairo, Egypt http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9638-8481
  • Hala Mahmoud Department of Bacterial Sterility, Central Laboratory for Evaluation of Veterinary Biologics (CLEVB), Abbasia, Cairo, Egypt

Abstract

Objective: The study of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection is needed, not only to understand the disease process but also to understand the
interference with the evaluation of some live viral poultry vaccines. This study aims to investigate the titration and potency of some live attenuated
poultry viral vaccines; Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis, infectious bursal disease, and Reo in both specific pathogen-free (SPF) embryonated
chicken eggs (ECEs) and chickens.

Methods: Titration of live attenuated viral poultry vaccines in ECEs was carried out by dividing the inoculated eggs into four groups; the pre-,
simultaneously-, post-, and non-MG contaminated. MG effect on the potency test was carried out using seventeen groups of SPF chickens (25 chicken/
group) placed into separate isolators. Each live attenuated viral poultry vaccine was inoculated into 4 groups.

Results: The highest titer of these vaccines that appeared in MG pre- contaminated ECEs were 10
11, 107.5, 107.9, and 10, respectively. The lowest vaccinetiters that appeared in non-MG contaminated ECEs were 108, 106, 106.8, and 1067.5, respectively. Although the potency of these previous vaccines indicated thatthe highest antibodies titer that appeared in MG pre-infected vaccinated chickens were 7.5 log, 36 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay unit (EU), and42 EU, respectively; the lowest antibodies titer that appeared in non-MG infected vaccinated chickens were 6.5 log22, 12 EU, 17 EU, and 10 EU, respectively.

Conclusion: The present study findings underline the importance of using Mycoplasma -free eggs or chicken for the production of virus vaccines.
Keywords: Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Newcastle disease virus, Infectious bronchitis virus, Infectious bursal disease virus, Reo virus, Chicken, Specific
pathogen-free eggs.

 Keywords: Mycoplasmagallisepticum,Newcastlediseasevirus,Infectiousbronchitisvirus,Infectiousbursaldiseasevirus,Reovirus,Chicken,Specific pathogen-free eggs.

 

Author Biographies

Marwa Fathy, 1Department of Bacterial Sterility, Central Laboratory for Evaluation of Veterinary Biologics (CLEVB), Abbasia, Cairo, Egypt
Microbiology Veterinary Biologics
Mounir M Elsafty, Quality Control of SPF Eggs Department, Central Laboratory for Evaluation of Veterinary Biologics (CLEVB), Abassia, Cairo, Egyp
Microbiology Veterinary Biologics
Jakeen K Eljakee, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt
Microbiology
Howaida I Abdalla, Department of Chemistry of Natural Compounds, National Research Centre, 12622 Dokki, Cairo, Egypt
Chemistry of Natural Products
Hala Mahmoud, Department of Bacterial Sterility, Central Laboratory for Evaluation of Veterinary Biologics (CLEVB), Abbasia, Cairo, Egypt
Microbiology Veterinary Biologics

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Fathy, M., M. M. Elsafty, J. K. Eljakee, H. I. Abdalla, and H. Mahmoud. “STUDY THE EFFECT OF MYCOPLASMA CONTAMINATION OF EGGS USED IN VIRUS TITRATION AND EFFICACY OF SOME LIVE ATTENUATED POULTRY VIRAL VACCINES”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 10, no. 1, Jan. 2017, pp. 216-22, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i1.14930.
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