INCREASED URINARY 8-OXO-7,8-DIHYDRO-2′-DEOXYGUANOSINE EXCRETION IN A SAMPLE OF EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH BETA THALASSEMIA MAJOR: MARKER FOR LIPID PEROXIDATION-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE


Mona A Elabd, Dina Abu Zeid, Marwa A Elhady, Maged A El Wakeel, Ghada M El-kassas, Rania N Sabry, Eman Awadallah

Abstract


Objective: The objective of this research was to evaluate oxidative stress status in children with β-thalassemia major.

Methods: Our study was conducted in children with β-thalassemia aged from 5 to 15 years. Investigate the urinary excretion of human 8-oxo-7,8- dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, which will be analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To investigate serum levels of antioxidant enzymes include glutathione s-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT).

Results: We found a significant elevation of the urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine level with p=0.001 compared to control group, a significant reduction of both GST and CAT p=0.05 and 0.03, respectively, compared to control group. There was a significant negative correlation between urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanisine and CAT level, r=−0.378, p=0.016, hemoglobin - r=−0.610, p=0.001, hematocrit (%) - r=−0.478, p=0.002, while a significant positive correlation between urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanisine and alanine aminotransferase - r=0.547, p=0.001, and serum ferritin - r=0.391, p=0.013. There was a significant negative correlation between CAT and serum ferritin - r=−0.320, p=0.44.

Conclusion: We conclude that the strongly increased urinary excretion 8-oxo-7,8=dihydro-2′-deoxyguanisine indicates elevated lipid peroxidation induced DNA damage in internal organs such as the liver. These highly pro mutagenic lesions may contribute to the increased risk of thalassemia patients to develop hepatocellular carcinoma.


Keywords


Thalassemia major, Children, oxidative stress, Oxidative DNA damage.

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About this article

Title

INCREASED URINARY 8-OXO-7,8-DIHYDRO-2′-DEOXYGUANOSINE EXCRETION IN A SAMPLE OF EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH BETA THALASSEMIA MAJOR: MARKER FOR LIPID PEROXIDATION-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE

Keywords

Thalassemia major, Children, oxidative stress, Oxidative DNA damage.

DOI

10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i12.21045

Date

01-12-2017

Additional Links

Manuscript Submission

Journal

Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research
Vol 10 Issue 12 December 2017 Page: 171-174

Print ISSN

0974-2441

Online ISSN

2455-3891

Statistics

32 Views | 33 Downloads

Authors & Affiliations

Mona A Elabd
Department of Child Health, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt.
Egypt

Dina Abu Zeid
Department of Child Health, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt.
Egypt

Marwa A Elhady
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. 3Department of Clinical and Chemical Pathology, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt
Egypt

Maged A El Wakeel
Department of Child Health, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt. 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
Egypt

Ghada M El-kassas
Department of Child Health, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt.
Egypt

Rania N Sabry
Department of Child Health, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt.
Egypt

Eman Awadallah
Department of Clinical and Chemical Pathology, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt.
Egypt


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