LONG AND VERY LONG FATTY ACID FRACTIONATION IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS IN THE ACTIVE AND INACTIVE STATUS

  • MIRASARI PUTRI Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Islam Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia
  • LANIYATI HAMIJOYO Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran–Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, Lupus Study Group, Research Working Group of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia
  • VILYA RIZKIYANTI ALITA Lupus Study Group, Research Working Group of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia
  • NUR ATIK Lupus Study Group, Research Working Group of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia
  • MAS RIZKY A. A. SYAMSUNARNO Lupus Study Group, Research Working Group of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, Indonesia

Abstract

Objective: Flare in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an exacerbation of SLE clinical features that were earlier quiescent. The disease activity changes from inactive to active with an increase of several immunological profiles; the rise of immune activity induces a metabolic shift in SLE patients. The previous study aimed to investigate the long and very long fatty acid fractions (LCFA and VLCFA) in the active and inactive statuses of SLE patients and showed there were dynamic changes in fatty acid fractions in SLE patients, compared to healthy subjects. The aim of this preliminary study is to investigate LCFA and VLCFA in the active and inactive condition of SLE patients.


Methods: Four serum samples of active and inactive statuses from the same SLE patients were used in this study. Serum LCFA and VLCFA fractions were analyzed by a 7890 Gas Chromatography (GC) System 5977 Mass Selective Detector (MSD).


Results: All of the LCFA and VLCFA fractions were increased in the active condition, compared to SLE patients in inactive, although they were statistically not different (p>0.05). The total fatty acid fraction was 38% higher in active condition compare to inactive. The prominent increase of fatty acid fractions was alpha-linolenic acid (inactive vs. active: 23.25±17.97 vs 48.25±38.58 μmol/l), oleic acid (1300±190.4 vs 1774±866.3 μmol/l) and myristic acid (31.25±12.76 vs 59.25±40.4 μmol/l).


Conclusion: The serum of LCFA and VLCFA fractions in SLE patients tend to increase in active conditions.

Keywords: Disease activity, Fatty acid, LCFA, SLE, VLCFA

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PUTRI, M., HAMIJOYO, L., ALITA, V. R., ATIK, N., & SYAMSUNARNO, M. R. A. A. (2020). LONG AND VERY LONG FATTY ACID FRACTIONATION IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS IN THE ACTIVE AND INACTIVE STATUS. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 12(3), 83-86. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2020.v12s3.39483
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