EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OUTCOME AMONG SEVERE SEPSIS AND SEPTIC SHOCK PATIENTS IN A SOUTH INDIAN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

  • Merin Babu Department of Pharmacology, Amrita School of Pharmacy, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Amrita University, Kochi, India
  • Vidya P Menon Department of Internal Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Amrita University, Kochi, India
  • Uma Devi P. Department of Pharmacology, Amrita School of Pharmacy, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Amrita University, Kochi, India

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the prevalence of severe sepsis and septic shock and evaluate its outcome.

Methods: This was a prospective, observational study, in which adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock were included. Relevant information was collected from medical records and the hospital information system.

Results: A total of 250 patients [mean age 57.2 y (range: 18 to 98 y)] was studied. The majority of the patients suffered from severe sepsis (81.2%). Most of the episodes occurred in males (75.2%). Major comorbidities included diabetes mellitus (51.2%), hypertension (44.8%) and chronic liver disease (30.4%). One hundred and seventy-eight patients (147 patients with severe sepsis and 31 patients with septic shock) had a positive culture with urine being the main site of infection. One hundred and two patients (40.8%) had a monomicrobial infection while seventy-six (30.4%) patients had a polymicrobial infection. Within the monomicrobial infections, the gram negative organisms predominated (54%). The mean hospital stay for patients with severe sepsis was 11.5 d. Mortality was noted in 79 patients (40 patients with septic shock and 39 patients with severe sepsis).

Conclusion: The main causative pathogens were gram negative bacteria. Admissions meeting septic shock criteria have a high mortality rate. Hence, it is imperative to identify patients who are at high risk and treat them promptly to reduce serious consequences.

Keywords: Severe sepsis, Septic shock, Mortality

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How to Cite
Babu, M., V. P. Menon, and U. D. P. “EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OUTCOME AMONG SEVERE SEPSIS AND SEPTIC SHOCK PATIENTS IN A SOUTH INDIAN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 9, no. 5, May 2017, pp. 256-9, doi:10.22159/ijpps.2017v9i5.17102.
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