STABILITY STUDIES ON FLUCLOXACILLIN SODIUM IN RECONSTITUTED ORAL SUSPENSIONS

  • Michael Worlako Klu Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Central University. P.O. Box 2305, Tema, Ghana
  • John Antwi Apenteng Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Central University. P.O. Box 2305, Tema, Ghana
  • Bright Selorm Addy Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Central University. P.O. Box 2305, Tema, Ghana
  • David Ntinagyei Mintah Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Central University. P.O. Box 2305, Tema, Ghana
  • Elikem Katsekpor Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Central University. P.O. Box 2305, Tema, Ghana

Abstract

Objective: Stability studies on flucloxacillin sodium in reconstituted oral suspensions were carried out. The experiment sought to investigate the effects that the different types of water for reconstitution and different storage conditions have on the stability of flucloxacillin sodium in the reconstituted suspensions.

Methods: Suspensions of flucloxacillin sodium were reconstituted with tap water, commercial bottled water (Voltic brand was used), commercial sachet water (Everpure brand was used) treated tap water and distilled water and stored under refrigeration (RF) (4-6 °C), at room temperature (RT) (31-33 °C) and in a bowl of water (BW) (26-27 °C). Assay of flucloxacillin sodium was by iodimetry at predetermined time intervals for 8 d.

Results: The amount of flucloxacillin sodium in all the suspensions stored under the various storage conditions reduced with time and at different rates. The percentage breakdown, a parameter of stability, was calculated for each reconstituted suspension stored at the different conditions investigated and they were as follows: commercial bottled water (RT-22.40 %, RF-9.90 % and BW-15.90 %), distilled water (RT-29.14 %, RF-18.0 %, BW-28.80 %), tap water (RT-25.0%, RF-14.60 % and BW-25.10 %) and commercial sachet water (RT-25.0 %, RF-10.17 % and BW-22.50 %).

Conclusion: At the end of the study, it was found that those suspensions reconstituted with the commercial bottled water were the most stable and had the smallest breakdown of flucloxacillin sodium whereas those reconstituted with distilled water were the least stable and had the largest breakdown of flucloxacillin sodium. Commercial sachet water reconstituted more stable suspensions than tap water. Also, the suspensions stored under refrigeration were the most stable followed by those stored in a bowl of water. The formulations kept at room temperature were the least stable and thus, had the largest breakdown of flucloxacillin sodium.

Keywords: Flucloxacillin sodium, Iodimetry, Storage condition, Suspensions, Water

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Author Biography

Michael Worlako Klu, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Central University. P.O. Box 2305, Tema, Ghana

Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy

Lecturer

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Klu, M. W., J. A. Apenteng, B. S. Addy, D. N. Mintah, and E. Katsekpor. “STABILITY STUDIES ON FLUCLOXACILLIN SODIUM IN RECONSTITUTED ORAL SUSPENSIONS”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 10, no. 9, Sept. 2018, pp. 21-28, doi:10.22159/ijpps.2018v10i9.27286.
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