COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF FIRST ORDER, ABSORBANCE RATIO AND BIVARIATE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHODS FOR DETERMINATION OF ATOVAQUONE AND PROGUANIL IN PHARMACEUTICAL FORMULATION MALARONE®

  • Vijay D. Chavada Gujarat University
  • Nejal M. Bhatt Gujarat University
  • Mallika Sanyal Gujarat University
  • Pranav S. Shrivastav Department of Chemistry, School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380009

Abstract

Objective: Three simple, rapid, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the simultaneous estimation of atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations.

Methods: The determination of drugs was carried out using the first order derivative, absorbance-ratio and bivariate spectrophotometric methods. The methods were validated for their linearity, accuracy and precision, recovery and ruggedness according to the ICH guidelines.

Results: The linearity was established in the concentration range of 1.0-10 µg/ml for atovaquone and 0.5-8.0 µg/ml for proguanil hydrochloride by all three methods. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) of the methods varied from 0.252 to 0.270 µg/ml and 0.764 to 0.825 µg/ml for atovaquone and 0.119 to 0.156 µg/ml and 0.361 to 472 µg/ml for proguanil hydrochloride respectively. The intra-and inter-batch accuracy (% recovery) and precision (% RSD) ranged from 99.16 to 101.05 % and 0.603 to 1.048 for atovaquone and 99.74 to 101.12 % and 0.593 to 1.001 for proguanil respectively.

Conclusion: The proposed methods were applied to a pharmaceutical formulation with acceptable accuracy and precision without any interference from commonly used excipients and additives. The results show that all three methods are comparable, cost effective and rapid and thus can be readily used in quality control labs for routine analysis of these drugs.

 

Keywords: Atovaquone, Proguanil hydrochloride, Derivative spectrophotometry, Absorbance-ratio method, Bivariate Method, Malarone

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Chavada, V. D., N. M. Bhatt, M. Sanyal, and P. S. Shrivastav. “COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF FIRST ORDER, ABSORBANCE RATIO AND BIVARIATE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHODS FOR DETERMINATION OF ATOVAQUONE AND PROGUANIL IN PHARMACEUTICAL FORMULATION MALARONE®”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 7, no. 9, July 2015, pp. 165-71, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/7296.
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